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Tuning stability on Bigsby


(@rob77)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 137
Topic starter  

Howdy guys,
Just chasing suggestions to improve the tuning stability on my Gretsch. Love the bigsby, but it can put the old girl out. Not good at the start of a set!
Should I change from a pivoting bridge to a roller bridge, or just upgrade the pivoting bridge with a better built one? At the moment it's got the 'spring loaded' type :(

The bridge is mounted straight to the body on pins (tune-o-matic style), it's not floating.

Machine heads seem reasonable quality & I have abount 4 rounds of wire around them (been told that too much will decrease stability with trems). Any advice appreciated -

Cheers!

PS. it doesn't have a zero frett & it's been set-up including being compensated at the nut.

"Who says you can't 'dive bomb' a bigsby?!"


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(@97reb)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1223
 

I like this question, as I have a Bigsby for which I have been waiting to find the right guitar.

It is a small world for metal fanatics. I welcome you fellow musicians, especially the metalheads!


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(@rob77)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 137
Topic starter  

Yeah, I know trems can be hard to keep stable, but just trying to get best I can. I normally tune it, then dive bomb it, then re tune before getting underway. I think this helps as everything is ready for that motion & there's not such a big slip. I suspect the bridge, because that's what my luthier suggested, but also it's usually the G string that goes out the worst, so mabe it's saddle is poo...?

"Who says you can't 'dive bomb' a bigsby?!"


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