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I want to record...what do I need?

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Kevin72790
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

Okay. I know I need a mic. I'm thinking of the Sennheiser e609 or Shure SM57...check.

Then what do I need? A pre-amp? What's a good cheap one that I can record into, and then transfer the mp3 files onto my computer for mixing?

Are there any other options besides a pre-amp? Is it possible to record with a mic straight into the computer?

Problem is I've heard if your computer's sound card isn't that good, that'll be difficult (mine is).

What are some other accessories I might need? Honestly I'd like to spend under $175 if possible, but I realize that's unlikely.


   
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Big Lar
(@big-lar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 165
 

I think you need one of these:

Line 6 TonePort UX1

or its big-daddy:

Line 6 TonePort UX2

I have the UX1 and it records very nicely. It supports direct recording of your guitar, and has a decent mic preamp. It also has line-level inputs so if want to feed in a mixer (or amp, or other line-level source) you can. Or, if you need two Mic preamps (or phantom power) you should check out the UX2.


   
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Nuno
 Nuno
(@nuno)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3995
 

Hi Kevin!

What do you want to record? With a computer? If electric guitars (or acoustic-electric through the cable) you can use some device that transform the audio from the guitar cable to a digital info. There are several devices. For example, some multi-fx can do, there are specific "external sound cards", there are also special "cables" jack to USB that include the converter.

If you use this method, you can only record from your guitar (and the other inputs in your "device").

You can also use a mic. You can record all with the mic but sometimes it is also more difficult. You need a good situation for the mic, the position and distance to the amp or the guitar is an important issue. There are two types of mic (basically): dynamic and condenser. They have different responses. The condenser mics usually need a special power that sometimes it is provided by the device (those "external sound cards").

Also you need the software in the computer. Windows users have the Audacity and several other freeware or free software. Mac has the GarageBand (you can use Audacity as well).

Now, some names: for direct recording people use Line 6 Pod. My Zoom G2.1u also can do it. I have a cheap condenser mic (sorry I don't remember the brand, I can update when I arrive at home). An also one of those "external cards": Audio Kontrol 1 that includes the "phantom power", that special power for condenser mics. This is an example of jack to USB cable.

Some hardware devices include also free limited software licenses of pro software. For example, Cubase. They are completely operative but they limit the number of track that you can manage simultaneously or similar.

As you can see, there are several alternatives... This is not too easy...

I hope it helps! :D


   
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Kevin72790
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

I think you need one of these:

Line 6 TonePort UX1

or its big-daddy:

Line 6 TonePort UX2

I have the UX1 and it records very nicely. It supports direct recording of your guitar, and has a decent mic preamp. It also has line-level inputs so if want to feed in a mixer (or amp, or other line-level source) you can. Or, if you need two Mic preamps (or phantom power) you should check out the UX2.
Very cool. Looks like something I could use. So it looks like, I could plug a Shure mic into that, right, and then plug that Line 6 device straight into my computer. Or if I want plug my guitar straight in.

Thanks.
Hi Kevin!

What do you want to record? With a computer? If electric guitars (or acoustic-electric through the cable) you can use some device that transform the audio from the guitar cable to a digital info. There are several devices. For example, some multi-fx can do, there are specific "external sound cards", there are also special "cables" jack to USB that include the converter.

If you use this method, you can only record from your guitar (and the other inputs in your "device").

You can also use a mic. You can record all with the mic but sometimes it is also more difficult. You need a good situation for the mic, the position and distance to the amp or the guitar is an important issue. There are two types of mic (basically): dynamic and condenser. They have different responses. The condenser mics usually need a special power that sometimes it is provided by the device (those "external sound cards").

Also you need the software in the computer. Windows users have the Audacity and several other freeware or free software. Mac has the GarageBand (you can use Audacity as well).

Now, some names: for direct recording people use Line 6 Pod. My Zoom G2.1u also can do it. I have a cheap condenser mic (sorry I don't remember the brand, I can update when I arrive at home). An also one of those "external cards": Audio Kontrol 1 that includes the "phantom power", that special power for condenser mics. This is an example of jack to USB cable.

Some hardware devices include also free limited software licenses of pro software. For example, Cubase. They are completely operative but they limit the number of track that you can manage simultaneously or similar.

As you can see, there are several alternatives... This is not too easy...

I hope it helps! :D
To answer your first question, I'd mainly like to record...hear it back on my computer. Improve on what I'm playing...and just create my own stuff. I hate the sound quality I get from my camera. Plus recording just seems fun to me. It's fun hearing yourself back.

Do you think "Big Lar" is on the right track with me? That seems like an option for me, and so does your other recommendation.


   
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dogbite
(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

take a look in here. tos of info:

http://www.tweakheadz.com

an SM57 should be in every studio. a versatle mike, both for instrument and voice.
the SM57 is a dynamic mike. you don't need phantom power.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
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Nuno
 Nuno
(@nuno)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3995
 

Do you think "Big Lar" is on the right track with me? That seems like an option for me, and so does your other recommendation.
Yes, of course! I tried to show you all the possibilities. The Toneport is a kind of "external sound card" (I use the quotes because they aren't exactly sound cards) and it is similar to my Audio Kontrol: it is a device in which you can plug your guitar and/or your mic and convert that analogical signal to a digital signal to be processed by the computer.

Line 6 is a great brand. People use the PODs because it can be used as a standalone multi-fx as well (the processing is made by the unit). You can plug the dynamic mics in the UX1 (the Shure SM57 or SM58). The condenser mics need the phantom power so you should go to the UX2.

With these devices, all the effects (amps emulations, modulation, overdrives, etc.) are performed in the computer. They include its own software but you could use another one as well, free or proprietary (Audigy, Cubase, Kristal...).


   
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Nuno
 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3995
 

take a look in here. tos of info:

http://www.tweakheadz.com
Great site! Thanks!

BTW, I forgot to give the name of my condenser mic. It is a Studio Projects B1. It seems the people on that forum recommend it as the better around 100$.

(I have to learn to write more quickly.)


   
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Big Lar
(@big-lar)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 165
 

Very cool. Looks like something I could use. So it looks like, I could plug a Shure mic into that, right, and then plug that Line 6 device straight into my computer. Or if I want plug my guitar straight in.

Yes, you most certainly can plug a Shure mic into either the UX1 or UX2 and record direct to your computer's hard drive. I do this myself. And yes, you can plug the guitar straight in as well. I also do this. Both inputs work great. They have fantastic ASIO drivers and no detectable latency, at least on my HP 2710p Tablet PC.

As Nuno said the software (GearBox) that comes with the device provides a wide variety of amp and effects models that you can use to customize your sound prior to recording. Or, if you already have the sound you want coming from your amp/effects chain, you can either mic the amp, or if it has line-level out, you can line it into either the UX1 or UX2.

Once you have the sound you want, you can record it with the bundled recording software, Ableton Light I believe, or you can download a free Line 6 branded version of RiffWorks 2, or use any other recording software package that supports ASIO sources, including all the free and cheap ones (Audigy, Kristal, Reaper, etc.).

It really does seem to be a great product. I think you get a lot of value out of a pretty small entry price.


   
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jeffster1
(@jeffster1)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 231
 

After trying many recording configurations I settled on an M-Audio external Firewire audio interface (soundcard). It provided a huge sound improvement. If you want a sample, you can check out http://www.myspace.com/jeffevanssolo

All I used for that recording is three guitars (Ibanez S Series, Fender deluxe strat, Eastwood SG) through a Roland cube 30x amp right into the audio interface. I'd recommend the M-Audio to anyone.


   
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Cat
 Cat
(@cat)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1224
 

Someone suggested to me to take a course at a Community College for Digital Engineering. I thought "I've managed this far" so I shined it on. Then I spent...like $8000 on sofware...each CD coming with "phone book sized" instruction book.

So, okay. I went back to school (at 50!) and have never regretted it. My (then) 15 year old came along with me (14 month course) and now he's into his second year doing a bach in Digital Recording Engineering. (Hey...surf up the course at GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA for a look at what I mean.)

"I want to record...what do I need?"

Go to school and find out. It's cheap, fun, and you'll make great friends. You may even end up knowing what you're doing, too! If you can manage to make a good living off of your guitar you'll have a great life (other than being a pro golfer making a million a day walking over rich peoples lawns staying at 5 star venues with your own chef following your caddy around).

No kiddin'. I done it.

Cat

"Feel what you play...play what you feel!"


   
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