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Powered Mixers?

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Off He Goes
(@off-he-goes)
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Okay, to continue with my thread about the difference in mics, lets talk about the difference in mixers.

I'm looking at some of the commonly recommended mixers for home recording, and I've started to wonder about the difference in mixers. Are powered mixers only for P.A. systems, and ones like this
http://www.behringer.com/UB1002/index.cfm?lang=ENG

only for recording. My school has a powered mixer that I have to operate a fair bit for acoustic shows and stuff. They also have a bigger mixer for concerts and what not. I never thought about the difference in mixers before though.

So whats the deal with powered mixers? & Non Powered(?) mixers?

Vacate is the word...Vengance has no place on me or her...Cannot find a comfort in this world.


   
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Mike
 Mike
(@mike)
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Power mixers are good for small gigs at coffee houses and such because you don't have to have powered speakers so it is lighter and more compact.

If you got a powered mixer all you would have to buy is passive speakers (= less money) as opposed to having to buy active speakers (= expensive) because you have a normal mixer. Then again, powered mixers are generally more expensive so, the price might balance out at some point.

Normal mixer will need an amp to drive the speaker.

Mike


   
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kent_eh
(@kent_eh)
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Simple difference:
Powered mixers have one or more power amps built in. Non-powered mixers don't.

Most powered mixers allow for bypassing the amps, to allow you to feed the mix out to something else (bigger amp, recorder, whatever), and allow for external inputs to the power amps. That might be used to run the sub-group outs to the amps for monitors or something else.

Normally a powered mixer would be reserved for live, if you have a choice.
However, there's generally nothing stopping you from using a powered mixer for recording, as long as you can connect the mix out to your recording device.
And you could use that 'lil Behringer for doing a live mix of a very small band (like a lounge duo), if you wanted to.

*edit*
Another random thought on the subject.
While there is no practical limit, most powered mixers I have encountered are less than 16 channels. Usually in the 4-12 range.
My theory in explaining that : if you need more channels, you probably have a big show. And those usually mean a big enough venue to need more power than built-in amps can reasonably deliver (remember there's only one 10-15 amp power cord)

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Off He Goes
(@off-he-goes)
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Thanks. Kent_eh I'm not looking for the behringer to do gigs with, I was just curious.

Vacate is the word...Vengance has no place on me or her...Cannot find a comfort in this world.


   
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TwistedLefty
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just a heads up on the powered mixers,
i suggest reading lots of revues before buying anything of course.

my own study into this subject reveiled a lot of reviews that complained that the upper echelon of Behringer "powered" mixers were very "under"-powered. to the point of being practically useless for the job they were supposed to do.

#4491....


   
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Off He Goes
(@off-he-goes)
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^Thanks for the heads up Twisted. I don't think I will bother with a powered, as I haven't really a need for one yet. I'll just stick with a non powered mixer, for recording purposes.

Vacate is the word...Vengance has no place on me or her...Cannot find a comfort in this world.


   
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