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good solid state amp

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Flintstone
(@flintstone)
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hi everyone,
does anyone have any sugestions for a really good solid state amplifier. everyone goes on about tubes but i am not teribbly fond of some of their features, such as cost and maintenance. what are the best ones, in peoples opinions. i am after a really good quality one that could be used for practice and still be loud enough to be heard over the drummer. is this possible or is it best to get a practice amp a seperate bigger one?


   
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JasonColucci
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hi everyone,
everyone goes on about tubes but i am not teribbly fond of some of their features, such as cost and maintenance.

Really? Beause that's what I love about tube amps. :lol: Anyways, you'll find alot of people recommending the Vox Valovetronix amps on here. If you're looking for something a little cheaper, I've heard great things about the behringer (sp?) amps combined with a line 6 pod (okay with the pod they may not be cheaper but it's a useful tool to have anyways.). IMO, stay away from line 6 amps, specifically the spider II (Do they make any others?) as they sound sort of digital/refined.

Guitarin' isn't a job, so don't make it one.


   
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Flintstone
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thanks Jason,
i had a look and it looks like just the ticket, a sort of halfway. valves and electronics doing what they do best, but together! thanks for the tip! i guess it lighter that an all valve model to......


   
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PVTele
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The Valvetronix amps are excellent - yes, lighter than pure tube amps - I can still remember how my arms felt after carrying an AC30 across London on the Underground when our van was out of action, back in the old days :shock:

The Fender pure solid-state FM series are surprisingly good too, and very resonably priced - I use a small one one for practice, rehearsals and small gigs, and it's never let me down, despite much abuse. Very loud for the watts, knockout clean tone, and it responds well to a processor (Zoom GFX-1 in my case) which is how I use it all the time now.

I've been considering getting a bigger solid-state amp, in the 60-80W bracket - there's a Fender FM-65R - and I recently tried out a Peavey TransTube - this was a Bandit, 80W - there's a Studio Pro at 65W, and an Envoy at I think 40W. Very nice sound, very warm and responsive, and the two bigger ones have a power limiting device, like a built-in HotPlate, which would come in handy for small gigs.

Come to think of it, the bigger Valvetronix amps have power limiters too, and they're essential equipment considering the power-stage modelling on the Valvetronix amps, which means they sound better the more they're cranked, just like the "real thing".


   
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Ignar Hillström
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Line6 makes excellent amplifiers actually (Flextone series, HD147, Vetta series) although I agree the Spider series ain't much at all. Vox would get my vote, Roland has some nifty things happening with their cube series and you could always use a clean transistor poweramp coupled with a quality modeler. The last option would be my preferred way to go. With a seperae cab, neutral poweramp and modeler you have a modular setup, meaning you can replace every part you may come to dislike later on.


   
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Dan T.
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Check out some Crate amps too. I picked up the GT212 last summer, and it's a good solid amp. If you want effects, check out their GLX212. Both have 120watts, & 2-12" speakers. Plenty loud to be heard over the drummer. :wink:

Dan

"The only way I know that guarantees no mistakes is not to play and that's simply not an option". David Hodge


   
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Musenfreund
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Yep, I've got a Crate 212 that I use for gigs. I'm fairly satisfied with it.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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drewsdad
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Even some of Crate's lower models, I have the FXT30, have decent power and good sound. The FXT30 has a good clean channel, some useful effects - not all - but some, and a not so great distortion channel ( too much noise and mud for me ). But it's plenty loud for practicing and it won't break the bank. Adding your own pedals makes it sound much better than the built-in distortion. Most of their 30 watt combo's appear to be built off the same basic design.

Life's journey can be hard at times, but you have to realize that you are the only one with the power make it a worthwhile experience.


   
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Wes Inman
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I am a tube amp person myself, but when it comes to solid states, I really like Roland. I have heard many Roland amps and they are always outstanding.

The Roland Cube 60 has power to gig, models, and effects. Good amp. Very high customer ratings.

Roland Cube 60

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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forrok_star
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You'll also find guitarist like myself that use tube amps to achieve our tone and solid state power amps to amplify that. With so many amps on the market its hard to say one amp is better than another. it comes down to personal choice for the tone your searching for. What sounds good to one may not work for your application. Try a few out and work from there.

Joe


   
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English one
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I'll second that motion for the Fender FM series. If you just want a good sounding, simple solid state they're great, and very loud. I've got an FM212R, which is far too big for me now, but sounds amazing.

Those Vox valvetronix look great, never tried one though. Roland cubes are brilliant amps, but a bit pricey


   
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mcdouggy
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I recommend the Peavey Bandit/Transtube series, they have a great tone for an exclusively solid state series, and they're Peavey - pretty hard to break. I found a Bandit 112 for £200 over here new so they're not exactly expensive, I'm not sure what exactly that's equivalent to in Australian moolah though. The older, boxy series is sposed to be better, with the other type of speaker, than the newer one I have apparently, it'd also be even cheaper!

The Vox Valvetronix series are also very very very good, probably a bit better tone than the Peavey Transtube series, and more versatile effects wise. They have one tube (a 12AX7, which would only need replacing every 3 years or so, if at all - cheap as). They do not have some features that the Transtube has though and they have had some issues with reliability, annoying things like the input jack falling into the amp..caused heart attacks all round 10 mins before our gig!

I also hear that the Roland JC Jazz Chorus series, especially the JC-120 are very good, and very popular with jazzers (as well as ska and metal believe it or not).

The most important thing though is to try the amp in the flesh yourself, how else are you to know?

Doug

Visit my band's website!


   
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vink
 vink
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I would like to add my votes for the VOX AD30VT (which I own) and the Roland Cube 30 (which I use at my guitar lessons). Both are pretty portable, have a good set of models and are quite loud. I think that the Roland is probably a little lighter, although you should really check the specs. It is definitely slightly smaller.

--vink
"Life is either an adventure or nothing" -- Helen Keller


   
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Flintstone
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Topic starter  

thanks for the leads,
I agree that ones ears are the final judges, but my problem is not having any experience with amps. I dont trust sales people very much. I mean, a good one will point out +'s and -'s of a product but many dont, so its good to have a network of people who do.
thanks.


   
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forrok_star
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You'll find plenty to read on difference's of opinion's when it comes to solid state v. all tube. When your out and about trying different amps out, ask the sales person if they have a room where you can take an all tube amp so that you can run it at its saturation point. Might as well see if they have a equalizer pedal and an attenuator to test it with also. I know I sound like a scratched album, but I always recommend tube amp first, equalizer second, and attenuator third.

Whatever you decide have fun trying them out and try out as many different type's you can before you make your final decision.

Joe


   
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