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When buying a PA system


(@barbiesteel)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 14
Topic starter  

Hello there!,

I sing with a hard rock band and i have to buy a PA system with microphones and all. Since i am new to sound equipment, i do not know much even of what i need. I am thinking about buying a Yamaha Emx 312s powermixer OR a Behringer PMP-2000 combined with 12" Fame speakers. Would that be good enough for a hard rock or a heavy metal band?

Thank you all.


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(@diceman)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 408
 

Yes and no . Probably no . One heavy metal guitar amp cranked up to 11 is capable of drowning out a thousand watt per channel PA system . IF some restraint is possible in the guitarist's volume (and the drummer's) you might get away with it but if you play really loudly at rehearsal it isn't enough .

If I claim to be a wise man , it surely means that I don't know .


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

I agree with Dice if you are a loud band it's probably not enough. we play classic rock and we play fairly loud and the Berhinger I have which i beleive is rated at 800 W can't keep up when we crank it.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3711
 

And guitars and drums can go louder for a given room without feedback problems than a PA system can.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@barbiesteel)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 14
Topic starter  

Thanks for the answers,

Since my budget is limited (500-800 euro max.), i don't think i can afford all pieces for separate (amplifliers, equalizers, etc.)
As i read Scott's Pa systems tutorial.

I saw a bundle pack where the power mixer, speakers and microphone where included and i thought i could solve my problem.
I thought about this kind of PA setups, because that's what the last singer of this band was using, and i used this equipment too, for a while. It was ok. Only my microphone was conected to it and my voice could be heard on the rehearsals.
The plan of this band is to play in small clubs, bars en so on, so i thougt maybe this would be enough.

I still think on buying one of this packages, and i wonder whats better; the yamaha or the behringer powermixer. I am also wondering about the difference that would make this or that kind of speakers on sound and power.

Thanks again. :)


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(@danlasley)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 2135
 

Both Yamaha and Behringer make good gear. I like the Behringer better, but not by much.

As noted above, the concern is based on the belief that a "hard rock" band will be loud. Loud is always difficult to deal with. If your band can keep the volume levels sane during rehearsal, and keep the stage level reasonable during performances, then you should be fine. If the volume gets too high, you'll have feedback issues, and it is more likely to sound like mush.


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(@henry-b)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 9
 

Check out www.studiospares.com


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(@chalkoutline)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 157
 

You may want to consider renting a PA system before buying. That way you can get a baseline starting point.

If you rent a 500W and it doesnt cut it, you either need to try something with more juice or get the other players to back off somewhat.

This way you wouldnt be guessing and possibly wasting your money.

Interview guy: What is the source of your feedback?
Neil Young: Volume.


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(@barbiesteel)
Active Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 14
Topic starter  

Hello everybody,

I bought some months ago the boundle-pack. It was giving me feedback, but i bought then a shure microphone, and it works fine now. I wonder how other bands use the mixer. I only connect the microphone of the vocals to it; but in theory you should be able to connect all the instruments, right?.
Anyway, 300 W. is juuuusst enough for the vocals, at least in the situacion i am in. We play in a good size room, hard-rock and metal, with one guitar at the moment, one bass and the drums. The band doesn't play too loud i guess.

Renting equipment was also a good idea....thanks.


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

You have to tweak the PA to stop the feedback this invloves pushing each channel of the equalizer until you hear feed back then backing the slider down, then increasing the master and until you hear feedback and then finding the particular channel and bringing that down a bit, continue to repeat until you have the system maxed out.

I beieve Wes Inman wrote details on the procedure so you might want to search the forums to find it.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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