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Only my opinion- DMB was crap

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(@drink2much)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

I saw dave matthews band last night at verision wireless apmatheter, out side kansas city mo, last night, I know a lot of people here don't care for him but live at red rocks and crash are twodisks that inspired me, well last night I was disappointed, but on the up side, the tickets were free so I was just wanting to say i'm sorry dave went corporate. :( :( :(

There are about five things to write songs about: I'm leaving you. You're leaving me. I want you. You don't want me. I believe in something. Five subjects, and twelve notes. For all that, we musicians do pretty well.
Elvis Costello- Esquire, NOV 03


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 Mike
(@mike)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2931
 

but on the up side, the tickets were free so I was just wanting to say i'm sorry dave went corporate. :( :( :(

Anyway!

My wife and I have NEVER been disappointed at ANY of their shows (and we have been going for a while!)

What was your “selling out” problem/point?!?!?


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(@drink2much)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

first of all- this is my opinion- and i'm entitled to it.

when you stand in the crowd behind the guy with the wireless keyboard and watch him work the lights to get to crowd going, when all his new stuff sounds the same, when his radioplay is more than ever but it's his old stuff. corporate

When the guy standing next to me says the same thing i'm thinking, and the girl at my wifes work says the same thing to my wife as i did. that tells me it was not his best show, i've seen him twice both times i was disappointed. like i said free seats

There are about five things to write songs about: I'm leaving you. You're leaving me. I want you. You don't want me. I believe in something. Five subjects, and twelve notes. For all that, we musicians do pretty well.
Elvis Costello- Esquire, NOV 03


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 Mike
(@mike)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2931
 

Sorry, but his new stuff DOESN'T sound the same as the older stuff. Thats like comparing apples to oranges.


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(@jasoncolucci)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 340
 

I can offer an unbiased opinion in the sense that I'm not a huge follower of DMB (this also makes me less informed so take it for what it's worth.) But I too find his new stuff sounds alot like his old stuff.

Guitarin' isn't a job, so don't make it one.


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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

I've seen him twice in concert and found both shows to be good. But you also have to figure that anyone who tours as much as his band does is entitled to a bad night now and then. Of course, that doesn't do much to cheer you up if you happen to have the misfortune of catching them on a bad night. Maybe they're weary of touring and are losing their edge?

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

If people radically change their sound they become either sellouts (REM) or pretentious (Radiohead). If they don't they are just regular sell-outs (U2). Pretty much every artist you've ever heared of is selling out. Michelangelo was selling out to the Pope. Haven't heared much of them so can't say more about it, but 'sell-out' has always been a pretty pointless argument. Besides, if they didn't 'sell-out' they couldn't waste their time giving free concerts, the dudes have to eat, you know.


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(@nicktorres)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5468
 

oooooh if only someone would ask me to sell out. Please?


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(@sullivandf)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 66
 

I've never understood the "sell out" argument. He's good at what he does and people enjoy it. That translates into more record sales, larger concert venues, etc. Is he (or any other artist in his shoes) supposed to recede into the shadows until the interest fades?

For my money, he's a great guitarist. He's on VH1 Storytellers on Tuesday and I can't wait!

And Arjen, no band has ever changed their sound during the course of their career more than U2 has.


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(@musenfreund)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5134
 

I've never understood the "sell out" argument. He's good at what he does and people enjoy it. That translates into more record sales, larger concert venues, etc. Is he (or any other artist in his shoes) supposed to recede into the shadows until the interest fades?

For my money, he's a great guitarist. He's on VH1 Storytellers on Tuesday and I can't wait!

And Arjen, no band has ever changed their sound during the course of their career more than U2 has.

I don't know, I think that distinction might apply more to the Beatles. But then I'm biased.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


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(@drink2much)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

First- I refuse to defend my opinion.

Second- Like I started, Dave Matthews is a driving force behind me picking up a guitar in the first place.

finally- when your at hyome depot and you here dmb that screams sellout what I said was "corporate" there's a profound difference, selling your song to a car maker is sell-out, making music for the a&r guy is corporate.

There are about five things to write songs about: I'm leaving you. You're leaving me. I want you. You don't want me. I believe in something. Five subjects, and twelve notes. For all that, we musicians do pretty well.
Elvis Costello- Esquire, NOV 03


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

drink2much,

DMB doesn't do much for me personally, but the sellout thing is alittle different.

As long as the artist's songs are the ones he wrote and are arranged and sound the way the artist wanted then I don't think they are selling out..it's just promoting their product.

Now my take on selling out is, say your an indie band writing music that you like, the way you like, then all of a sudden you sign a record deal and the record company strong arms the whole process and brings in a producer and starts adding violins and harps and chnages the whole song so much that it is completely different than what you intended as an artist.
And if you were that artist and you went along with those changes even though it went against everything you ever did as an artist then I would say that is selling out...now if that record deal was worth mucho $$ then who can blame them, everyone has to eat.

So I guess I would agree with most people that I'm not sure what selling out really means.

On the other hand if you had a hit and now they are using them in commercials..that's not called selling out it's called capitalism..and that's what this country was founded on.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@mr_clean001)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 88
 

I have to agree with cnev here. First, I am not a big DMB fan. Never have been, don't think I ever will be. (Then again I said the same thing about the Dixie Chicks and ended up seeing their Live DVD and was AMAZED at the guitar player in the backup band.)

Back on point...I don't get the sell-out arguement. Sting had a song in a Jaguar commercial, Aerosmith in GAP, Lenny Kravitz in GAP, hell, even Seether (a relatively new heavy band) had a song featured on some wrestling show. We had a huge debate about this in one of my MBA classes, and it boils down to this (in my opinion). As media consumption habits change (Tivo, iPODS, Internet On-Demand, Digital Music) musicians have to be more creative in A. getting their stuff heard by new types of audiences and B. marketing their stuff in general. Think about SoundClick (I think that is the name of the site where people post their original music) - if I am an A&R guy and I am looking for new bands, I would spend an hour a day going through SoundClick rather than travelling from town to town looking for the next big thing. I could be wrong but I haven't heard of the "next big music town" like Seattle was to grunge or alternative when Nirvana broke.

Nirvana was considered a sellout when Nevermind came out because of the distribution. Green Day sold out when Dookie came out and distribution went through the roof. Metallica sold out when Bob Rock came on board and the Black Album went platinum and took them mainstream. Really? I mean come on, this isn't selling out in my opinion. First you have to market yourself as creatively as possible - I mean isn't the goal for as many people as possible to hear the music? So it was on a commercial or the concert was sponsored by a corporate entity - who cares if people heard and enjoyed the music. Hell, even cell phones now have ring tones of music (I have a friend who has the Ramones "I Want To Be Sedated"). The variety of media out there today is staggering....if the goal is to be heard, then not taking advantage of the tools available is rather short sited. Again just my opinion.

I mean, if you play a song in a room alone and it would have made Muddy Waters weep, is it really any good? Some people play for themselves, which I respect completely, but these bands wanted to play for others and I think it is part of being in a band to be heard.

Anyway - I have ranted and I apologize.....don't mean this to come off as harsh - just another opinion in a sea of them.

"Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest...if it makes you
feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers.
Then you'll know you're on to something!"
- Ted Nugent


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(@twistedlefty)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 4166
 

drink2much,

DMB doesn't do much for me personally, but the sellout thing is alittle different.

As long as the artist's songs are the ones he wrote and are arranged and sound the way the artist wanted then I don't think they are selling out..it's just promoting their product.

Now my take on selling out is, say your an indie band writing music that you like, the way you like, then all of a sudden you sign a record deal and the record company strong arms the whole process and brings in a producer and starts adding violins and harps and chnages the whole song so much that it is completely different than what you intended as an artist.
And if you were that artist and you went along with those changes even though it went against everything you ever did as an artist then I would say that is selling out...now if that record deal was worth mucho $$ then who can blame them, everyone has to eat.

So I guess I would agree with most people that I'm not sure what selling out really means.

On the other hand if you had a hit and now they are using them in commercials..that's not called selling out it's called capitalism..and that's what this country was founded on.

#4491....


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(@drink2much)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

It's amazing that all this started by Dave put on a bad show, as I was working today in a H. D. I just happen to hear DMB, that's where that crack came from. But tell me honestly, if your a DMB fan can you HONESTLY tell me the new stuff is as good or better than "Crash" or "Under the table..." IN MY OPINION which is how this started I think dmb is in it for the money and they know, if they put out a record it will sell millions, figure a buck a cd, for everybody in the band two for the songwriter. thats not a bad year I don't care who you are, the point I was trying to make was watch live from folsom field DVD and then go to the concert I saw and there is a hugh difference. I still like dave, I think he's talented #41 off of Crash or Crush from before these crowed streets, shivvers everytime.

I especially enjoy the "heated" discussion with out personal jabs, profanity name calling or all around hooliganism, In My Opinion: it's a tesamnet to the high caliber of people who read, write and review Guitar Noise and I for one would just like to say thanks!

I think I'll go put in some Dave and Company...good day :D

There are about five things to write songs about: I'm leaving you. You're leaving me. I want you. You don't want me. I believe in something. Five subjects, and twelve notes. For all that, we musicians do pretty well.
Elvis Costello- Esquire, NOV 03


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