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Parody Song Liabilities?

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rparker
(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5480
Topic starter  

So, I wrote and made a pretty funny "parody song". The song picks on someone who made the news due to a massive lapse of judgment. It's a combination of comedy and statement with a dose of fiction. The name and situation is very real, sadly enough, but I used some stereotypical attributes to fill in the blanks and increase what I hope if comedy value. The few that have hear t so far say it is funny..

So, if I put this out there on Sound-Click or Sound Cloud or something, can the person who I wrote this song about get bent out of shape and try to take legal action against me?

I'm not looking to make any scratch from it. It's just me and my awful musical ability that I should be fined for let alone get paid for. Then again, I would not want somebody to rip it off, either. I was thinking of creating an account somewhere anonymously using an email address that I would create somewhere else just as anonymously. I'm sure anyone worth their salt as an investigator could get to the bottom of that.

So, anyone have any thoughts?

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


   
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TRGuitar
(@trguitar)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Dunno .... But I'd like to hear it!

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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NoteBoat
(@noteboat)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

When I think of a parody song, I'm thinking along the lines of Weird Al Yankovic. If that's what you mean, you're golden - the Supreme Court has already ruled that sort of thing fair use. (The decision is Cambell v Acuff-Rose Music, Inc; the decision is here).

But reading over your post again, it seems like your worry might be about getting sued by the person it's about. If the incident is true, that's a defense against claims of defamation. But if you're exaggerating, you start to get on shakier ground.

But even if you're on solid ground, as a general rule people with lots of money can afford to hire attorneys who can cost YOU a lot of money, even if you're right. So it sounds like your anonymity plan might be the pragmatic one, even if you're legally safe.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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rparker
(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5480
Topic starter  

When I think of a parody song, I'm thinking along the lines of Weird Al Yankovic. If that's what you mean, you're golden - the Supreme Court has already ruled that sort of thing fair use. (The decision is Cambell v Acuff-Rose Music, Inc; the decision is here).

But reading over your post again, it seems like your worry might be about getting sued by the person it's about. If the incident is true, that's a defense against claims of defamation. But if you're exaggerating, you start to get on shakier ground.

But even if you're on solid ground, as a general rule people with lots of money can afford to hire attorneys who can cost YOU a lot of money, even if you're right. So it sounds like your anonymity plan might be the pragmatic one, even if you're legally safe.

The incident is true, but what happens before and after the incident is totally mad up and is the funny part of the song. After reading what you wrote, I should probably either sit on it or put it out there very anomymously.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


   
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notes_norton
(@notes_norton)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1497
 

I'm not a lawyer so don't count this as legal advice - if you go this path, check with someone qualified to be sure:

How about changing the names of the people involved and stating in the credits that it is a work of fiction and any similarity between any persons living or deceased is purely coincidental.

You know, like they do in the movies.

Notes

Bob "Notes" Norton

Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com Add-on Styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft SongSmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<


   
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cnev
 cnev
(@cnev)
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Hmm just put it out there as Notes said just change the name(s), I really have a hard time believing someone and that someone is the person the song is about is going to hear it and do anything about it.

Personally I think you are way over cautious

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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fleaaaaaa
(@fleaaaaaa)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 680
 

Agree with Cnev.. it's unlikely the person you are talking about will ever hear it. I did one a while back about a certain celebrity, she never saw it and I had so few views that I doubt she ever would have. It would really have to become an internet sensation of some kind. :lol:

together we stand, divided we fall..........


   
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