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Sickest Possible Guitar Riff Ever.

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(@scrybe)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2246
 

You claimed "And why the hell do we have so many darn companies making effects nowadays? Because of Jimi." Which is not correct, or at least I cannot find anything crediting Hendrix to that. You say he made those effects more popular. That is not innovation. It is not MY definition of innovation either. If you check webster's dictionary http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/innovation it defines it as something new, so if Hendrix is just taking an idea someone else has already come up with and making it more popular, he's not the innovator.

This is all my feelings on it. Please do not post telling me I cannot discredit because of this, or say he's an innovator because of that. I am allowed to interpret Hendrix, music, the world and reality however I wish. The only consequence of me thinking this way is I miss out on Hendrix's 'magic' which I am more than willing to live with. It doesn't bother me that I'm missing out and it shouldn't bother anyone else.

With regards to your first comment - you can't simply use the fact that some of the effects may have already been available prior to Jimi using them to argue that he didn't innovate. The whammy bar was present on Fender strats from their inception in the mid-late 1950s as Leo Fender wanted to emulate some of the lap steel sounds on guitar. Leo was an innovator in guitar design because of that new deelopment. But the whammy bar was used quite conservatively. Then Jimi came along and innovated in the area of music creation by using Leo's innovative guitar design in a new or novely way. Leo Fender may have designed the whammy bar, but when he was did so, he never envisaged it being used like Jimi used it. As for the Octaiva, yup he did ask Roger to make that for him, and they collaborated on numerous designs for new pedals. Jimi also pioneered the use of backwards guitar out of discussion with Eddie Kramer, his engineer, about Jimi's desire to make his guitar "sound like its being played underwater."

On your second point, yes you can choose to interpret the world and reality anyway you wish. But if you ignore recorded facts which don't chime with your world-view then you're being pretty irrational. Unless you want to go down the route of full-blown scepticism. But if you did go down that route, you wouldn't have any need to be posting on messageboards. Communication presupposes an 'other' and presupposes some form of objectivity.

But, overall, I'm guessing you need to give your world-view a shake up some. Over the course of this thread you seem to have moved from a position whereby you only care about objectivity and what can be objectively assessed, to a position where everything is subjective, including the history of 20th century music. And neither position is ideal, since both are susceptible to massive epistemic black holes.

If you want to argue that Jimi wasn't an innovator, I really have no problem with that. All I'd ask is that you consider how robust your argument is when you clearly haven't studied 20th century music in any great depth.

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


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(@grungesunset)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 344
 

I listened to some of Hendrix's stuff, 3rd Stone From The Sun, Machine Gun and 1983... (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) and listened to some stuff before he came about like BB King, I had to read some Hendrix biographies to see what was prominent before that. I have to admit it's different enough from what was around before to call it innovative.

"In what, twisted universe does mastering Eddie Van Halen's two handed arpeggio technique count as ABSOLUTELY NOTHING?!" - Dr Gregory House


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(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 840
 

I listened to some of Hendrix's stuff, 3rd Stone From The Sun, Machine Gun and 1983... (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) and listened to some stuff before he came about like BB King, I had to read some Hendrix biographies to see what was prominent before that. I have to admit it's different enough from what was around before to call it innovative.
Exactly why I said to give more of his music a chance before having an opinion.


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(@grungesunset)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 344
 

I listened to some of Hendrix's stuff, 3rd Stone From The Sun, Machine Gun and 1983... (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) and listened to some stuff before he came about like BB King, I had to read some Hendrix biographies to see what was prominent before that. I have to admit it's different enough from what was around before to call it innovative.
Exactly why I said to give more of his music a chance before having an opinion.

I seem to recall having an opinion before which was that I didn't think Jimi Hendrix was innovative. Of course, you said it was idiotic and stubborn. Seems to me it's more of an issue of me agreeing with you than forming an educated opinion. I really can't see you questioning someone who calls him innovative saying they've only heard Purple Haze. Maybe 3 songs isn't enough for me to call him innovative. Assuming I listened to them, for all you know I just searched his discography put the songs in the post, am lying and my opinion isn't any more educated than it was before.

But you are right, I should give music a chance, and I don't think I've heard enough to call him innovative. Thank you for opening my eyes.

"In what, twisted universe does mastering Eddie Van Halen's two handed arpeggio technique count as ABSOLUTELY NOTHING?!" - Dr Gregory House


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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

I listened to some of Hendrix's stuff, 3rd Stone From The Sun, Machine Gun and 1983... (A Merman I Should Turn to Be) and listened to some stuff before he came about like BB King, I had to read some Hendrix biographies to see what was prominent before that. I have to admit it's different enough from what was around before to call it innovative.

Understatement of the year.

Let's put it this way, the year Hendrix came out with his Are You Experienced album the top group in the world was The Monkees. Now, I was and am still a Monkees fan, they wrote a lot of great songs, but nothing like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4yZXb4aD2Q

Like I said, you weren't around. The first time Hendrix played live in the U.S. was to front The Monkees. He was boo'd offstage, because people simply could not understand his music. He was just on a new plane altogether. But guitarists all over the world caught on quick and electric guitar changed forever. There were other groups that were using distortion and effects, especially the Yardbirds in England, and Cream. But Hendrix completely transformed the way guitarists played guitar forever.

You hear the backwards solo in this song. The Beatles had used that, but nothing that could remotely compare to a solo like this.

With Hendrix you have to listen closely. The real creativity is in the background. Listen and you will hear.

And I am no Hendrix fanatic. I like many of his songs, many I do not. But anybody who played guitar at that time knew he was the greatest influence on electric guitar, probably ever. Music has not been the same since.

And it wasn't his death that made him so famous. His career was short, only three years. Yet still today dozens of his songs are still played on the radio everyday. You can't say that about Yngwie, or any of the shredders. That is the difference. He was super creative, yet still wrote a great song.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

I'll admit, i love shred stuff.
Big metal fan, like it extra cheesey and ridiculously impossibly fast. Possibly more for the lols than the music but i have massive respect for the players.

That said Hendrix is, in my opinion, one of if not THE greatest electric guitarist of all time.

Before Hendrix people didn't play electric guitar. They played acoustic guitar on a guitar with pickups.

Hendrix made the electric guitar it's own instrument, with some help from a few of his pre-decessors. think where we'd be without his innovations in whammy bar technique, wah, flanger, overdrive... just to name a few.

To this day i can't listen to castles made of sand without a lump forming in my throat and my heart wanting to leap out of my chest, the strings he plays are those of the heart.

I like shredders to check out their technique and laugh at their bad songs (except satch, hes a rad songwriter)

I like hendrix for totally different reasons.

its not shred vs something, everything has its place.

You have to admit tho hendrix is freakin sweet.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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(@noteboat)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

Before Hendrix people didn't play electric guitar. They played acoustic guitar on a guitar with pickups.

Oh, I don't think that's true. Link Wray, Chuck Berry, Eddie Cochran, Paul Kantner, Pete Townshend and a bunch of others weren't exactly finger-picking grandpa's Martin.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5468
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cadbYIzhqQ&feature=related

Paco De Lucia, John McLaughlin , Al Di Meola


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

Before Hendrix people didn't play electric guitar. They played acoustic guitar on a guitar with pickups.

Oh, I don't think that's true. Link Wray, Chuck Berry, Eddie Cochran, Paul Kantner, Pete Townshend and a bunch of others weren't exactly finger-picking grandpa's Martin.
Hence the "with help from a few of his predecessors" part. Didn't mean to ruffle feathers. I love those guys as well. Jeff Beck Is another one who is probs my all time fave guitarist.

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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