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Taste in Music and Respect to Others Taste in Music

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Rahul
(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2736
 

Take it easy, Kevin.

Every person is made different and every person thinks differently.

Your ideas may not match with your friends. Here you are saying that they don't respect your favourite artists even while you respect theirs. So, let it be.

I know people can be really irritating at times and sometimes you are left wondering - 'How can this person like such music ?'

You cannot change someone else's thoughts or behaviour. What really matters is how you react to them. The real test lies when someone is acting stupid with you, yet you can shrug the thing off without spoiling your mood.

In this world, you can be good. But don't expect others to be the same to you.

Life goes on.


   
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Ignar Hillström
(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

I'm a bit surprised you don't know about the n-word man.

Well, I know the word but over here in the Netherlands we just don't like censoring words so much. Was kinda looking for a truly evil word of epic proportions that could instantly slay a dragon. it's kinda a big fuzz over a word. You know, you can't forbid people to dislike certain groups of people, so if you ban the word they just come up with a new one. Censoring words ain't the answer, being able to deal with it, bend the definition, morph it into something different, that's usefull. And it seems to be precisely that that's happening.
Put it this way, this current generation of blacks uses it because "it's cool" whereas the past couple generations of blacks would refuse to use that word. Why? Because it was used against them. Why would you refer to yourself as that? It's messed up.

Why? Because words change. I can name 15 different Dutch words for 'foreigner living in the Netherlands' that all have been politically correct at one time or another after which they get tainted. Then all of a sudden everybody is making a big deal out it after which a new word is chosen. A few decades later the old word will re-surface again. Boring. It's not about the word, it's about the attitude.

I don't know if you're black or not, but in any case IMHO the 'N-word' is not worse then 'black' or whatever. They are just words. What matters is the respect that is behind it. Give it five or ten more years and black will become the 'b-word'. My friends and I call each other all kind of names all the time, but it's infinitely more respectfull then the 'sir' I get from some people around here.

After that, context matters. If you think Snoop is really saying 'Darn, I wish we could all be slaves again' you got something wrong. You might dislike the word yourself, which is your right, but you seriously don't have anything to say on how other people interpretate words, use them or respond to them. Just because you don't get it don't make the rest of the world wrong.
Put it this way, it's kind of like if a Jew loved Hitler. Makes no sense at all. None.

Ehm, no, it's not at all like that. Hitler is a person that is repsonsible for the death of over ten million civilians. It's his name, and it won't change meaning over time. The 'word' is not a name but a word, which can mean many things depending on who uses it where, why, to whom, how and when. If tomorrow me and my friend decide that 'bunghole' is our new friendly word for each other then so be it. Maybe the outside world will think we're crazy and blunt but that only makes it more fun.
It's not what you are called, it is what you answer to.
+1


   
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kingpatzer
(@kingpatzer)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

Put it this way, this current generation of blacks uses it because "it's cool" whereas the past couple generations of blacks would refuse to use that word. Why? Because it was used against them. Why would you refer to yourself as that? It's messed up.

It's actually a very culturally astute move, conscious or not.

The primary tool of racism is language. By laying claim to the language of racism, the black community disempowers the vocal bigots of our society.

It's not messed up, it's actually a powerful statement of socio-political action.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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StormyMonday
(@stormymonday)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 429
 

It's not messed up, it's actually a powerful statement of socio-political action.

Dave Chappelle thought so too until he found out a lot of people thought his act was hilarious for all the wrong reasons.


   
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Kevin72790
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

Rahul- I know.

Ignar- Yea I know. It's way different over there when it comes to censorship. I wish America would do the same. I agree that they're just words, but for the sake of black people, it's rediculous that they use it for the reasons they do. And no I'm not black, I'm white. And it has nothing to do with me thinking the rest of the world wrong. It's just hypocritical.

And I know the Hitler example was very extreme, but it's all I could think of for you to maybe understand what I'm saying. And it is similar though, as many blacks were killed by white slave owners, as Hitler killed many Jews. Again, extreme, but it works...well enoguh, I guess.
So black people calling other black people or themselves 'the n-word' in their own rap song is bad? Just to be sure I'm getting it.

It's not what you are called, it is what you answer to.
Haha...you guys live in a totally different world than this world, that is, Brockton, Massachusetts, USA. I know the whole world isn't like this, which is why I wanna get out of here so soon. But it's a completely different world when you walk down the street in fear. I just hate seeing these innocent kids with their parents, and I think..."damn, I hope that doesn't get drawn in by the hood." Because too many kids around this area too, and around the world. It's about influence, and a lot of rap music is a very bad influence on kids because music is a powerful thing.

I don't think you guys seem to understand. Fact is, some black people use the word for all the wrong reasons. I like the way Dave Chappelle used it. He used it for humor and he tried to get rid of it, because words shouldn't have a meaning like that. Actions should.

Maybe you live in a community with a good crop of humans, but where I live all I hear is "n-word" this...and that...and this and that. It's just tiring hearing them, and white people too, using that word in an idiotic way.


   
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Wes Inman
(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5582
 

Wow, this thread has changed.

I think anybody using the "N" word is terrible. It is just a bad word, like a form of profanity. It doesn't matter who says this word, it sounds terrible. One reason I hate rap is because of all the profanity. I gotta admit, I let a foul word slip out of my mouth now and then. But it sounds terrible.

I guess you gotta let people say what they want to say, but when I hear foul language coming out of someone's mouth I am impressed that they are ignorant and unsophisticated. What is really shocking is that some people want to be seen this way and actually think it is cool. That is just immature.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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Nick Torres
(@nicktorres)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 5381
 

I almost never f'n' swear. ...more than once per sentence. Well that's not quite true, I have been known to use the above written profanity as verb, gerund and noun, subject and predicate all in one sentence. But you have to be in the proper company. My kids for instance have never heard me swear.

However, I've been known to use profanity to color sentences or to emphasize, or to parody or colloquialize, but not because I'm at a loss for words and substituting something profane. I probably wouldn't sing anything like that either. In a song or lyric, subtlety f'ing rules.


   
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Vic Lewis VL
(@vic-lewis-vl)
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As Oscar Wilde once said, "Swearing is the last refuge of those incompetent in the English Language." OK, things have moved on - but I don't think it's right to litter every sentence with expletives. Yes, we all let them slip out once in a while - but when I hear people speaking these days, I just wish they'd learn a different adjective other than the one that begins with F. When you hear a little kid of 4-5 years old calling his dad a effing b*****d, you know there's something wrong - when said father laughs and ignores it, you know there's something seriously wrong. If I'd come out with that word in earshot of MY dad, I wouldn't have been able to sit down for a week!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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Elecktrablue
(@elecktrablue)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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If I'd come out with that word in earshot of MY dad, I wouldn't have been able to sit down for a week!

:D :D :D

Vic

Definitely! In my entire life I never said a swear word in front of my parents. Partly out of respect, partly out of fear!!! :D

..· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
((¸¸.·´ .·´
-:¦:- ((¸¸.·´ -:¦:- Elecktrablue -:¦:-

"Don't wanna ride no shootin' star. Just wanna play on the rhythm guitar." Emmylou Harris, "Rhythm Guitar" from "The Ballad of Sally Rose"


   
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Nick Torres
(@nicktorres)
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I agree. There's a time and a place for everything.


   
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Vic Lewis VL
(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Definitely! In my entire life I never said a swear word in front of my parents. Partly out of respect, partly out of fear!!!

I'd just like to add, I never heard my parents swear in front of me - or my grandparents. "Bloody Hell" was about the worst I ever heard....my parents were strict, didn't believe in sparing the rod. There were lines you didn't cross - I could be a bit cheeky, but no way could I be disrespectful. I could speak my mind - I was encouraged to think for myself from an early age - but there were strict rules I couldn't break. If I was told to be in for 7 o'clock and came in at 5 past 7, that was my fault. Didn't matter that I didn't have a watch - I could have asked someone for the time. I was encouraged to think for myself, so it was my fault if I didn't.

Things seemed much simpler then when I was a kid - you listened to your parents and you did as you were told. You loved your parents, and you took it for granted they loved you. But you didn't just love them - you respected them. You listened to them. You learned from them. Things WERE simpler then - you did wrong, you got punished. You soon learned to do the right thing. But you didn't just do the right thing because your parents told you to - you did it because you wanted the respect of your parents, your friends, and their parents. And the bad kids leading you astray? Didn't happen - there was nothing the bullies could put you through that was worse than your parents punishing you - and being disappointed in you.

Those were the days when a policeman could clip a cheeky kid over the ear and not be sued for assault - the kid would learn respect for authority, not contempt. You came home and told your parents you'd been smacked by a copper, you'd get another smack - you must have been in the wrong to get a smack from a copper! - and sent to bed with no supper.

But whatever happened one day, you'd start with a clean slate the next day.....

Simple, innocent times. When I compare the young mothers on this estate, with their foul language and the street fights and the kids running wild and the arguments with this week's boyfriend and the abuse the kids give you just for walking past their house, to the way I grew up with strict discipline but with LOVE......maybe that's the missing ingredient these days?

For sure, there's something missing.....

Sorry this turned in to a rant, but it's just the way I feel.....

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


   
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Voidious
(@voidious)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 151
 

Well, this thread has quite a few topics, but to stick to the original post somewhat...
With music, to me, it's kind of like someone is ripping apart a religion. If someone ripped apart my sports teams I couldn't care less. I love sports, but it's not a "Religion" like music is for me.

You know what's funny, that really relates to the first thought I had after reading your original post. Someone wise (or someone who'd met someone wise, I'm not sure...) once told me, "there are 3 things you shouldn't talk about with friends: politics, religion, and money." Of course, for your very closest friends, you can usually ignore that advice, but I still keep it in mind. For a lot of us here at GuitarNoise, I bet music is a bit like religion.

-- Voidious


   
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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

As far as respect and authority goes, I agree with Vic. In my opinion, the world has been brought to the edge of chaos by the PC, do-gooding psychobabblers.
As far as musical taste goes, I think much of the problem stems from laziness with the language. Particularly in English, it's easy to leave words out and still be able to make sense. Your friends, who say "Hendrix sucks" probably meant "I think Hendrix sucks" but was too lazy to put the words in, incorrectly assuming that you knew what he meant.
If people would take the time to actually say what they mean, there would be far fewer arguments, started by misunderstanding and escalated by a "there's no way I'm backing down" mentality.

Make it clear that it's your opinion and not a statement of irrefutable fact.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
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gnease
(@gnease)
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Posts: 5038
 

Yea sorry guys. I feel like I came across as a bit of a whiny baby in that post. That's not how I was. In a nutshell, I was just frustrated with people and how they can show zero respect to someone's feelings. With music, to me, it's kind of like someone is ripping apart a religion. If someone ripped apart my sports teams I couldn't care less. I love sports, but it's not a "Religion" like music is for me.

Kevin: I can't help but think that this is a clear case of "What goes around comes around." IIRC, among your first posts on GN you trashed another new member's musical tastes based upon his choice of avatar. I'm not opposed to giving someone else ones own opinion of the other person's fave music, sport, etc. That can lead to interesting discussions. But if you are going to dish it out, better be ready to take it.

-=tension & release=-


   
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Kevin72790
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

lol at the people who think I'm whining that they don't worship Jimi like I do.

It has nothing to do with that. It has to do with the fact that simply, people don't have respect for other peoples tastes and it really sucks. I realize that'll happen but I had to post that somewhere to get it off my chest.

gnease- Hmm...I do remember having a heated discussion about music, and my tastes were trashed as well. But that was back in December/early January, before music truly changed my life.


   
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