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(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5899
 

When you've heard a good vinyl record through a top quality sound system, CDs will always be second choice, to me.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


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(@barnabus-rox)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2976
 

Like most people my age and older I have roughly got

850 LP's 78

and guessing here

1,000 's of 45's singles

I read an article awhile ago you can buy a record player that connects to your PC .. I was thinking of doing this and burning them onto CD'S at the same time , then I could listen to them while driving to work and so on .

Has anyone else heard of that ? Or was it some futuristic idea can't remember myself .

Kinky Dee and Elton John " Don't go Breaking my heart "

I know I have that as a single because it's in a frame on my bar with Elton Johns autograph .. many years ago

how time flies

hilch

Here is to you as good as you are
And here is to me as bad as I am
As good as you are and as bad as I am
I'm as good as you are as bad as I am


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(@bford)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 248
 

For me its hard to beat digital. When I first heard Dire Straits Brothers In Arms I was blown away by the crystal clear clarity of all the sound ranges. I was sold on cd's then. Especially digitally recorded cds.
I don't miss Snap, Crackle and Pop playing in the back ground of my old lps. I like vinyl for nostalgic reasons only. I have a few on my walls as decoration.
I always think of Steve Martin's Comedy Is Not Pretty. The skit "Googlephonics" was about the guy not happy with the new stereo he had so he went and added speakers. Still not happy he kept adding and adding and adding speakers till he finally gave up and realized, Hey, maybe its the needle.
CD's and MP3s. I have an mp3 with 30 gig hd. I put 200 full cd's on it and room for more. Sounds fine for me. Your mileage may vary.

Treat others how you would like to be treated.


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(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2198
 

Snaps crackles and pops on an LP are the result of either playing with cheap needles or failing to take care of the LP's.

I have 40 year old records that have none of those sounds. Though, admittedly, it's getting very hard to find stuff older than that that has been taken care of.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


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(@bford)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 248
 

Snaps crackles and pops on an LP are the result of either playing with cheap needles or failing to take care of the LP's.

Admittedly so. Growing up in a somewhat poor household didn't lend itself to having enough money to spend on quality audio equipment. Another positive of cds.

Treat others how you would like to be treated.


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(@elecktrablue)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4389
 

I use both. There are so many things on vinyl that you can't yet get on CD, although the number of things is getting smaller day by day! I collected vinyl for too many years not to still use them! Some are so rare, though, that I don't play them as often as I'd like to. I'm waiting for them to come out on CD so I can save my vinyl! In fact, that's what I've done with a lot of my collection!

..· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
((¸¸.·´ .·´
-:¦:- ((¸¸.·´ -:¦:- Elecktrablue -:¦:-

"Don't wanna ride no shootin' star. Just wanna play on the rhythm guitar." Emmylou Harris, "Rhythm Guitar" from "The Ballad of Sally Rose"


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(@timezone)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 209
 

I grew up listening to my parents' records (the 3-LP Woodstock collection was probably my favourite), but never owned any myself. Well, like someone else said, I've got a couple framed and on my wall, but that's it. I don't doubt that through a top-notch system, vinyl would (or could) beat CD, but a cheap CD player would probably beat out a cheap turntable. So for the masses (and for me), it's CD all the way.

TZ


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

Snaps crackles and pops on an LP are the result of either playing with cheap needles or failing to take care of the LP's.

I have 40 year old records that have none of those sounds. Though, admittedly, it's getting very hard to find stuff older than that that has been taken care of.

However, surface noise is unavoidable. It's part of the technology. And all needles are cheap -- we call the good stuff stylii.

Mixed and mastered properly, both sound fantastic. However, it was so much cooler buying LPs -- all that cover art and the very feeling of gingerly (or not for Black Oak Arkansas) holding a much loved LP, as one places it on the turntable. Whipping our the Staticmaster and Discwasher to discharge and clean (sounds a bit raunchy, that) before the listen. And turntables had a much cooler vibe than CD players as well.

So not for the sound, but the experience, I'll go with VINYL, baby. (Now where is my MP3 player?)

-=tension & release=-


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(@rodders)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1094
 

Its gotta be CD's so user friendly. You want a particular track, no problem, just press a number. No guess work or scratched disc :D

Be excellent to each other & party on dudes!
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=686668


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

The great thing about buying LP's in the old days was the covers.....something like the cover art on Yessongs just can't be appreciated on a tiny little CD.....

And you could actually read who played what..... no wonder I need reading glasses these days!

:D :D :D

vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@tucker)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 145
Topic starter  

I live in a small appartment, no way I will store a thousand vinyl records, so cds for me.

I knew a guy back in the 70's who had about 10,000 LP's He didn't have much furniture, but he did have one hell of a sound system Oh wow, I didn't know you and John Peel were buddies.


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(@timezone)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 209
 

Its gotta be CD's so user friendly. You want a particular track, no problem, just press a number. No guess work or scratched disc :D

Actually I've become pretty paranoid about my CDs getting scratched. I'm already on my second copy of Dark Side of the Moon... So now I back them all up on my computer before carrying them around anywhere. But anyways, I thought I'd share a tip about scratched CDs. You may have heard this before, and you were skeptical. I was skeptical the first time I heard it too, but then I thought about it a minute, and realized it just might work. You can fix slight scratches on the bottom of your CD with Turtle Wax. That cheap stuff that comes in a green tub and costs $3. Forget those Skip Dr machine things, that's a ripoff. Just use the Turtle Wax on the bottom of your CD the way you would buff your car. Apply a little bit, let it dry to a haze, then buff it off. The reason this works is the same reason the wax makes your car shinier. Your car's finish gets dull because the surface gets microscopic hills and valleys in it that doesn't reflect light perfectly. When you wax it, you fill in those hills and valleys. See now why it makes the CD play better? This only helps with small scratches on the bottom of the disc. If you've lost some of the metal layer (which is nearer the top), then you're SOL. No getting that metal back. Oh, and some people don't believe me when I tell them the metal layer is near the top. On most CDs it's actually VERY near the top. Grab a cheap silver CDR, and slap a piece of duct tape on the top side of it. Now rip it off really quick. Holy crap! the metal came off on the tape! Yeah. So I prefer CDRs with a nice thick layer of paint on the top, usually there for you to write on, but it's a much better protective layer.

TZ


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(@tucker)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 145
Topic starter  

I'm already on my second copy of Dark Side of the Moon...You shouldn't even be on your first...


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(@mikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 330
 

I love the nostalgia of the vinyl, the album art, the inserts, record sleves, lyrics that you didn't need a microscope to read.
Not to mention the secondary use double albums to assist in the removal of certain seeds from certain dried plants.

I also believe that the analog recording provides more depth and warmth to the ear vs. digital recording. That, like anything else is a matter of taste and perception I guess. Once listened to a test between the two with equally matched systems. Vinyl vs digital of the same recording. While the digital seemed more crisp the vinyl was more pleasing.

Of course digital is a way of preserving older recordings for generations to come. Wouldn't it be great to have had digital recordings of the great blues guitarists (or other great vocalists/musicians) that have long past.

Technology marches on. CD's were cheaper to produce, ship and store. Signed, sealed, delivered, vinyl was dead.

I still have a very small collection of vinyl. Harvest Moon (Neil Young) & Rumors (Fleetwood Mac) is a third copy and John Barley Corn (Traffic) is a second. Those as well as others, and my turn table, are boxed up in the name of space and expediancy, and have given way to CD's and the CD tower.

It's just the way things go.

Michael

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


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(@graycee_grey)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 18
 

Well, depending on what I am listening to makes the difference of whether I prefer vinyl over CD.

IMO, The Beatles and Led Zep sound the best on vinly - even though their albums (as most) have been "digitally remastered" on CDs, the songs just don't sound the same. Nothing beats the raw sound of "A Day In The Life" on vinyl - it gives me chills! Also, vinyls seem to hold the history of the music - to me, that is what makes classic rock - classic

On the other hand, I prefer listening to a band like GNR on CD. I don't think Slash's intense and heavy guitar riffs would sound the same on vinyl - hmmmm....the song "Locomotive" comes to mind! :o

"Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."


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