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What Bands Have Grown On You With Age?

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(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5492
Topic starter  

Someone in a recent thread brought something up recently that helped inspire this. (Sorry, I can't find the thread now)

I've had artists & bands that I've grown a greater appreciation for over the past few years. Well, even a genre or two has snuck onto my radar.

I'm sitting back in my chair right now listening to The Allmans' In Memory Of Elizibeth Reed and it kind of struck me that I didn't even like the Filmore East CD when I got it years and years ago. Now it's one of my go to CDs when I'm not sure what I want to listen too. I've really grown my appreciation for the Allmans over the past few years.

Anything like that happen to any of you?

(btw, is Wes is watching, his new band with keyboard player oughta give that tune a spin) :)

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@spides)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
 

the last five years have been a massive learning curve for me.

Knowing mostly just classic rock and modern punk, I came to uni and was introduced to about a million different genres by people who played them, and have been able to get an appreciation for. Now I am in love with jazz, metal, hardcore, funk, motown, hip-hop, Math-core(will explain if anybody wants to know) and a whole assortment of others. Even sub-genres within these that i previously had never heard of or imagined, and i am also constantly finding strange links between genres that i never knew of before, like the way hip-hop has roots in jazz and Blues, that kinda met in the middle with a spoken word style of poetry.
fascinating, I love music!!!

*Edit

Actually, probably the biggest style I've only kinda come into as a "grown up" would be ska/reggae/dub
Never really got much about what it was, where it was coming from in a socio-political sense, and what key stylistic characteristics were inherent.

Pretty amazing music in terms of the massive advances in racial unification, anti violence campaigning and political activism.
Although, much like hip-hop, where it started political, it has kinda gone into the gang culture, largely due to the intense corruption of the jamaican government and the massive contingency of gnagsters or "shottas in and from jamaica, as a result of police making a legitimate life close to impossible over there, so people rebel. Really quite sad, but the music still has the same off beat feel and awesome vibes that guys like jimmy cliff and bob marley had back in the day. And ska music is sounding as awesome as ever as well. Check out this innovative, pirate themed Ska band from melbourne, sadly disbanded now but one of my faves.
http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendID=12617360

Don't sweat it dude, just play!


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

Pink Floyd to a certain extent. I never really understood what the fuss was about - I liked the early Syd Barrett stuff far better than Dark Side-era Floyd. Wasn't really until the Division Bell I got into them again, and re-discovered things like Wish You Were Here and Comfortably Numb.

Red Hot Chili Peppers are another one. First thing I heard of theirs was Under The Bridge - then I didn't really like the next few songs they put out as singles. Took me a while to get back into them - probably down to the nuber of times they got mentioned in these forums!

Dylan. I was into pop music at a very early age - Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Hollies, Manfred Mann - but Dylan was, well, different. Took me until the seventies to appreciate his music, and especially his lyrics.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

Led Zep.. I didn't like them when they first came out. They sounded like a pile of noise to me. I've greatly changed my opinion of them since then.
I was just a dumb folkie at the time.

I'm still dumb, but I've changed my opinion.


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

Tom Jones! He just seems to be having fun -- kinda like William Shatner.
Weezer: Liked 'em before. Now I'm sold.
Roxy Music
Robbie Robertson (sans The Band, whom I've always liked)
John Hiatt
Duran Duran (WTF? I don't know why.)
Jack White -- more and more. Keep thinking he's the Johnny Depp or Robt Downey Jr of rock guitar.

-=tension & release=-


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(@boxboy)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1226
 

Two that come to mind off the top of my head:

Tom Petty
ELO

ELO: Quasi Beatle like, big melodic flourishes, not at all what I liked way back when. With cellos to boot! But a song of theirs popped up in a movie (Strange Magic; The Virgin Suicides, maybe?) and I remember thinking, 'Hey, that's a good pop song!' So I circled back and decided they weren't so bad after all.
Tom Petty: I'd lumped in with 'vapid arena rock', but his songs are really satisfying to me now. He's limited as a singer but I like how he conveys the lyric...and there's lots of nifty guitar interplay that makes the songs interesting to learn/play.
Funny about Pink Floyd, Vic...I love trying to learn to play their stuff...but as for actually listening to the records...I'm jumping out a window first...
:)

Don


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(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

back in 65 when I got my first electric guitar my dad wanted me to oplay some steel guitar cowboy music. it was his favorite stuff, but I could only roll me eyes. now, I can't get enough of that early country, western swing, and pedal steel/lap steel lick music. the song structure, lyrics and muscianship are killer. amazing licks.
yeah, it has grown on me.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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(@elecktrablue)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4389
 

back in 65 when I got my first electric guitar my dad wanted me to oplay some steel guitar cowboy music. it was his favorite stuff, but I could only roll me eyes. now, I can't get enough of that early country, western swing, and pedal steel/lap steel lick music. the song structure, lyrics and muscianship are killer. amazing licks.
yeah, it has grown on me.

That sounds familiar! My dad was a guitarist and began teaching me to play when I was 13 (in 1969). He also was into early country, western swing and old bluegrass. So that's what I learned to play even though I really wanted to be playing the Beatles, Rolling Stones, etc... But, he was my teacher so I learned what he wanted to teach! (I even had to learn the "Beer Barrel Polka"!! )

And, like you, I absolutely LOVE it now! I wish I had been more into it when Dad was teaching me, but at 13 all I wanted was to be cool and play rock and roll!

..· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
((¸¸.·´ .·´
-:¦:- ((¸¸.·´ -:¦:- Elecktrablue -:¦:-

"Don't wanna ride no shootin' star. Just wanna play on the rhythm guitar." Emmylou Harris, "Rhythm Guitar" from "The Ballad of Sally Rose"


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(@ness-k)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 156
 

I went from only kinda liking Foo Fighters to them becoming my fav band thats still togther and plays music, maybe even my fav band period.

"The Beauty of Music is my Sanity. Without it, I would simply lose my gravity, and blow away with the breeze." - Ness K(Aka Matt Harris)


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(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5492
Topic starter  

Pink Floyd is tough to get wrap yourself around, at least casually. Three eras, Sid, Roger and then David led efforts. I'm most familiar with the latter two. It's really quite a major transition they've done. Kind of like the Stones early stuff to Bigger Bang..... just 20 less years to do it. I've grown fond of some of the Animals album recently. The middle song, "Dogs" especially. Odd.

Steel Guitar cowboy music is awsome stuff. I've gone on record stating that I'm a fan of that much more than modern Country. (sorry to those aghast with my comment)

Kind of on a related note, the Blues Slide is something else I've grown fond of. I need to turn myself on to some original blues slide stuff. I've only got a couple dozen non-rock blues albums. The only one that comes to my medicated mind right now is Ronnie Wood on the Stones' '95 version of "Love In Vain". (Sorry Stones' purists, it's done on a steel guitar and sounds much more clues-like that Taylor's slide on the LP, IMHO.)

Bosboy: Yeah, Petty escaped that arena-rock thing rather nicely. Gotta thank the Wilburys' colaboration for that one. Timing is everything, eh?

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@barnabus-rox)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2976
 

The Stones

The Eagles

Here is to you as good as you are
And here is to me as bad as I am
As good as you are and as bad as I am
I'm as good as you are as bad as I am


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(@fever-and-hum)
Eminent Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 26
 

Bob Seger--Night Moves, and Against The Wind.
Man, where was I back then?
Probably, under just a different Rock

Hum


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(@jackss565)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 233
 

Nick Cave and the bad seeds

Couldn't stand them when i first heard the record, now can't get enough.

Jack


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 cnev
(@cnev)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4478
 

ja,

yea Nick Cave is pretty cool I think the first time I cam across him was when he did a song on Johnny Cashs album. I thought he had a great voice.

I'm kind of opposite of what Roy originally posted, I don't know of many if any bands that I didn't like and now I do, for the most part it's I used to like them and now they haven gotten old to me, which includes almost every classic rock band out there including the ones I used to love.

I think I'm wired different than most people, I'm not much into the past, to me that's exactly what it is the past and it's time to move on. Now being of the classic rock generation I play mostly classic rock songs and don't get me wrong I like a lot of them but the people I play with who are my age don't want to play anything but classic rock so that's pretty much what I'm stuck playing.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@ness-k)
Estimable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 156
 

I'll tell you one genre I will probably never like: Country. Now before all you attack this at once, let me remind you that this is just an opinion, so don't get bent out of shape. Country to me is so monotonous, make fun of rap all you want, but it is always changing. Country, from my point of view, has changed little since that whole Country-pop thing of the 90's. The only country artist I've ever liked was Johnny Cash, because he was different. Everyone else, blah.

"The Beauty of Music is my Sanity. Without it, I would simply lose my gravity, and blow away with the breeze." - Ness K(Aka Matt Harris)


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