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Will this hurt my amp?

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(@rparker)
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I've got Band-in-a-Box software on my laptop. I've recently routed my Boss GT-100 into the software (sister component called "Real Band") and back out through and into my headphones. It gives me quick and easy backing tracks to play against for fun and practice.

I got the bright idea of routing the L/Mono amp output from the GT-100 into the guitar in on my Fender Twin Reverb. I did it at very low volumes for many reasons, but this time was also to make sure I didn't fry anything in the amp.

My question is this. Will running this multi-instrument audio output including percussion, bass and other instruments hurt my 'Twin? I'm running at pretty low levels, if it matters. I know it's not optimal, but it saves me from having to bring down my big keyboard/PA amp in addition to not having to wear headphones, which saves a good bit of pressure on a tender spot near my bum ear after a while.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@trguitar)
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I'd just be concerned about the speaker is all. A lot of amps (cheaper ones) have MP3 (used to be CD) inputs for this reason. Your Twin is one of your "real" amps isn't it? The speakers may be voiced for guitar and not like some of the frequencies. Oddly enough I was thinking of doing a similar thing with backing tracks for practice only use my PA system and run my guitar through my SansAmp.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@rparker)
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Oddly enough I was thinking of doing a similar thing with backing tracks for practice only use my PA system and run my guitar through my SansAmp.
I've done that using a few different things upstairs in the "studio". Good fun.
Your Twin is one of your "real" amps isn't it?
Yup.
I'd just be concerned about the speaker is all. A lot of amps have MP3 (used to be CD) inputs for this reason. The speakers may be voiced for guitar and not like some of the frequencies.
All good reasons to give it a think and ask those in the know....or who claim to be in the know. Yikes! :|

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@trguitar)
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I mean I don't know, but my rule of thumb is if the amp has an MP3 input, I'm good to go. If its a PA or keyboard amp, good to go. Even a bass amp as it should have full range speakers. Guitar amp without an MP3 input ..... I err on the side of caution.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@rparker)
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I mean I don't know, but my rule of thumb is if the amp has an MP3 input, I'm good to go. If its a PA or keyboard amp, good to go. Even a bass amp as it should have full range speakers. Guitar amp without an MP3 input ..... I err on the side of caution.
That sounds like a great line of thought right there.

One thing I am curious about is that I've read the folks from the 60's using tube amps for everything. One comes to mind is the keyboard guy from The Doors. In his book, he tells the story of signing their first contract and getting free VOX gear, including amps. I think he mentioned that they all or almost all got the same amp.

The other thing is that the volumes I'm playing have got to be easier no matter what I pump through it as opposed to cranking out a guitar only signal at 5 or something. That, and one can run a multi=effect straight into a guitar-in jack. It's not a straight up guitar signal in some cases, right?

All that makes me wonder if I'm being a big sissy. That also might be an aside, too.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@trguitar)
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I'm sure low volumes didn''t bother it a bit. Speakers could well be full range too for all I know. I am over protective of my gear for sure. I heard that John Lord of Deep Purple pllayed his Hammond Organ through a Marshall. Thats why the sound.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@rparker)
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I saw an old '70-'71-ish Ampeg 2X12 down at the beach last Spring with one guitar jack and one accordian jack.

Checking the frequency range in the manual probably won't hurt.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@rparker)
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From the manual:
"Over the years, many musicians have found the versatile Twin Reverb a perfect match for guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, vocals, accordion, and the electric violin among others."

No speaker specs other than fender part number.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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(@trguitar)
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Bass, keys and acordian. Sounds like you're good then.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@trguitar)
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Bass, keys and accordian. Sounds like you're good then.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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well you guys know more about this stuff and your both alot more cautious then I would be but I wouldn't think it would matter. The speaker has some frequency response spec if a frequency that your putting through it is outside the range you just won't hear it I wouldn't think it would do any damage.

TR why do you think that having an Mp3 input would make it OK? I would think that input is just a convinience.

Now maybe if you are sending some really high or really low frequencies outside that range of the speaker at very high volumes you may have a problem but that might be a problem in any situation.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@trguitar)
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TR why do you think that having an Mp3 input would make it OK? I would think that input is just a convinience.
Ummmm ... cause thats what the jack is meant to be used for ...... playing along with recordings or backing tracks or drum machines ect. Why put that jack there if using it is gonna blow the speaker? The speaker damage I speak of in a speaker that is not full range would be due to the frequency causing the speaker to travel in a way it is not designed to, causing permanent speaker fart. We had a thread on here once upon a time about using guitar amps with a bass guitar.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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TR you missed my point.

I understand that's what it's meant for BUT just because they have an input jack I wouldn't think it means there is any special circuitry that somehow would protect a speaker any different than if you did what Roy did. All that does is allow you to have a backing track going through it while you play guitar through it at the same time.

Sure sending frequencies that are too low or two high for extended periods at high volumes might damage a speaker but that I would think would be the same regradless of whether the signal came from a computer or guitar or bass.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@trguitar)
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No, not special circuitry ...... MP3 jack = speaker that can handle the frequencies without damage. I suppose there could be a filter in those amps to weed out bad frequencies but I doubt it. Other than impedance matching I doubt they provide anything but a post preamp line in. I understand Roy is using the instrument input. I was simply saying that this feature would lead me to believe the speaker is full range.

Here is an old thread on the subject of playing bass through a guitar amp.

https://www.guitarnoise.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=5

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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(@rparker)
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Yeah, it's straight into guitar jack. No fancy dancy digital inputs in the original design.

I suspect that it's quite possible for a signal to run a different route to the speaker from an MP3 jack. Why would they want to run an MP3 through the pre-amp gizmos? I'd be willing to bet that there's a seperate patch for at least part of the way. Maybe until somewhere in the power-out. All that has no bearing on my situation, though.

Thanks for the link, TR. Kind of a related point to both discussions. Don't guitars have some garbage noise being generated at sub 40hz frequencies? It seems to me that if an amplifier could handle low amounts of garbage and filter it out that it should be able to handle low volumes of low frequency instruments. Just something else to chew on, I guess.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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