Guitar Noise Podcast #6 – 3/4 Timing

Apr07

Hello to everyone and welcome to the latest Guitar Noise Podcast!

Is this really the sixth GN Podcast? Amazing how time flies, especially when it’s spent doing something this enjoyable! I hope you’re all having fun with these podcasts as well.

This time out, we begin looking at 3/4 timing. First, using the chord progression G – Em – C – Am, we will employ a “bass/strum” pattern and then add in a bit of a walking bass line to move things along. We’ll then tackle a “straight eighth note” approach to the bass strum, using alternate picking to create a more flowing strumming pattern. For this part of the podcast, we’ll be using a G to D chord progression and then switch to Am – G – D. And if this sounds at all familiar, just consider yourself a lucky man (or woman) to have good ears!

Finally, we’ll combine both this straight eighth note strum with a walking bass line to have an impressive sounding bit of music!

As in our previous Guitar Noise Podcasts, I’ll be walking you step by step through the lesson. So don’t think that you ain’t going nowhere, get your guitar, get down on that easy chair and come along and play! And, as always, please let us know what you think.

Peace

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About David Hodge

Since joining Guitar Noise in November 1999, David has written over a thousand articles, lessons, interviews and reviews. He also serves as the site's Managing Editor, supervising all content in addition to the continued writing of his own lessons and articles.

In April 2013, David also joined the writing staff of Answers.com, heading up their Guitar Pages.

And if that wasn't enough to keep him busy, David also contributes frequently to Acoustic Guitar Magazine. He also is the author of three Idiot's Guide to Guitar books: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Guitar, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Playing Rock Guitar and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Playing Bass Guitar as well as The Complete Idiot's Guide to Playing the Ukulele and the co-writer of The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Art of Songwriting.

Comments [14]

  1. Hi David,

    Once again, thanks so much for the podcast. Your podcasts (and the entire GN site) are great resources for beginners such as myself who have to sift through all the information out there and try to make sense of it all. These contributions are like a life preserver in an immense (and sometimes rough) ocean!

    In podcast #5, you provided the tab/standard notation for the strumming pattern you introduced. Is there any way that you can do the same for subsequent podcasts, especially for strumming patterns that are as involved as that in podcast #6? I find it really helps having it visually, as well as listening to it.

    Once again, thank you so very much!

  2. Hi Chetwyn

    Thank you for your kind words concerning both Guitar Noise and our podcasts here at the Guitar Noise Blog. I’m glad that they’re being of help!

    In the future, I am going to try to put together notation/tab guides for our podcasts. It hasn’t been all that easy up to this point because of my personal teaching schedule. Not to mention I’m figuring out all that needs to be done for these podcasts on the fly. I think I’ve mentioned how weird I find recording these. It’s like teaching to an empty classroom. And I guess that since it’s empty I don’t even see that no one’s writing things down!

    But if you can put up with my growing pains in this venture, I’ll do my best to have more visual material for this audio teaching. Probably starting with Podcast #8 or #9.

    Thank you again for the comment and for your support.

    Peace

  3. Ditto Chetwin’s comments as to how useful these podcasts are. I find not having the tab is also very educational as it makes me listen closely to what you say and to what I hear on the guitar. You’re giving enough info to put together the tab ourselves and in fact I enter it into GuitarPro so I can play it at a speed I can manage and then up the tempo a few beats per minute as I progress.

    David, your delivery is fine (comments about OK etc).

    Thank you so much
    Tony :-)

  4. As an addition to Tony’s comments, it’s quite great to have them in podcast format, because you can rewind to your heart’s desire to get it just right. I’m quite okay with putting up with your growing pains :); in fact, I’ve printed blank tab and staff paper, and am starting to write them down myself (great way to learn notation at no extra cost!).

  5. I have just spent the night working through and enjoying your latest podcast. Unfortunately all these lovely chord transitions and embelishments leave the songs that I already know sounding very plain indeed.

    I am now going to have to work through them all and try to spice them up a bit. With my limited knowledge this is going to be a struggle, but onwards and upwards.

    By the way, I like to listen to the complete podcast, then go back through it in sections. I note down some bits, but mostly I try to visualise what you are saying, get that grounded then wind on to the next bit. Great training for “listening” to someone else play then trying to work out how it is done.

  6. Hi David,

    Just finished working through P/C #6 the other day; been taking them kid of slow because I really want to take time to practice what I learn in each one so that I feel like I have it down before moving on.

    Two thoughts on the P/C’s in general.

    Like some of the other posters, I have been tabbing out the exercises myself, and I find that to be helpful to me. Writing it out helps me to cement it in my mind. So far I am not missing anything not having the tabs posted. Perhaps if you get into some more complicated stuff it might help, we’ll see.

    My other thought is that, now that I’m learning all of these great things, I’d really like to start applying them to songs, etc. Perhaps you can offer some words on how to take what we’ve learned, for instance the Am-G-D progression from this lesson, and figure out how to apply the same prinicpiles to, say, a different chord progression or to a song. Also, it’s occurred to me that, of the techniques you’ve presented, some might work better than others depending on the situation.

    So, maybe a little guidance in the area of practical application might be in order.

    Otherwise, i really love these podcasts and please keep them coming!

    Regards,

    Mike

  7. Hi Mike

    Thanks for making time to share your thoughts about the Guitar Noise Podcasts. I think that when the next one (#14 already?) gets online Monday, you’ll be pleased to see that we are going to get started on practical applications of all that we’ve learned so far.

    Let me know if it helps!

    Peace

  8. Hi David,

    I just wanted to once again post my THANK YOU for the podcasts. I’m still playing “catch-up” as I’m only on #6… but I don’t want to rush thru them.

    It makes for a very pleasant Sunday afternoon to sit out back with a CD player, your podcast and a guitar. Thanks for making my summer.

    Arnie

  9. You’re welcome, Arnie. It’s a pleasure to make these Guitar Noise Podcasts and I’m thrilled that they are being of help to people.

    And you’re absolutely right to not rush through them. Sometimes it’s difficult to judge just how much to put into a podcast or how further to advance the following one. It’s good to trust people to take things at a pace that’s comfortable to themselves. Just be sure to holler if you run into a problem spot, okay?

    Looking forward to hearing how things are progressing with you.

    Peace

  10. Hi David,

    So I just went through podcast #6. I am not finished though. I find that there is so much information in each podcast that I can benefit by studying each one several times. I have them all downloaded into my iTunes program which makes it quick and easy to review them. They are a great learning tool. Thanks so much.

    Sooooo…(get it?) 1/2 way through you mention an award if we recognized the song. I don’t get an award. Can you tell me the name of the song, or is that cheating?

  11. Hi Joe

    Thanks for your kind words and thank you as well for making the time to download these Podcasts. I think it’s great that you can take them with you.

    And I guess I need to be a little more obvious with my clues! The song in question is “Lucky Man,” from Emerson, Lake and Palmer all those many, many (many) years ago.

    Peace

  12. Bruce Stubbs says:

    These podcasts are amazing, I just started playing when I came across these and what a difference it makes. However when I went to download #6 all I could get was 29 seconds worth of the lesson. Is there any other way to get the download for lesson six. Thanks and keep em coming

  13. Hi Bruce and thank you for your kind words concerning the Guitar Noise Podcasts. Glad you like them.

    They should all be up and working. Try it again and if you’re still having problems, email me directly at dhodgeguitar@aol.com and I’ll email you a MP3 file of the Guitar Noise Podcast in question. Only too glad to help.

    Thanks again for making the time to comment, not to mention for listening in the first place!

    Peace

  14. Im a huge fan already, man. Youve done a brilliant job making sure that people understand where youre coming from. And let me tell you, I get it. Great stuff and I cant wait to read more of your blogs. What youve got to say is important and needs to be read.

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