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Improving rhythm guitar playing

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(@zenmonkey)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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What do you do to improve you rhythm guitar playing?

http://www.NotionMusic.com


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 849
 

pratice with a metronome

Paul B


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Count.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@minotaur)
Noble Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1092
 

Count.

^ Absolutely.

Develop a consistent strumming pattern based on that counting and timing.

It is difficult to answer when one does not understand the question.


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Wow Noteboat that's what I do all the time and I kind of thought it's something that I shouldn't have to do but I still do it sometimes escpecillay if it's a new rhythm pattern or an oddly syncopated one.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@moonrider)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1309
 

Count.

Amen! Most of my "guitar face" pics are actually shots of me silently mouthing "one, two, three, four . . ."

Playing guitar and never playing for others is like studying medicine and never working in a clinic.

Moondawgs on Reverbnation


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(@moonrider)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1309
 

Wow Noteboat that's what I do all the time and I kind of thought it's something that I shouldn't have to do but I still do it sometimes escpecillay if it's a new rhythm pattern or an oddly syncopated one.

LOL! It's like my teacher told me all those years ago: "Son, if you lose track of that "One," all the angels in Heaven can't stop the train wreck. COUNT!"

Playing guitar and never playing for others is like studying medicine and never working in a clinic.

Moondawgs on Reverbnation


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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I feel better now

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@johnny-lee)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 48
 

I found a cool article yesterday on how to improve rhythm. http://sharemyguitar.com/blog/smg-guitar-lesson-tips-on-rhythm/ Moderator Edit: I tried to read this article and it wouldn't load.

I agree with most of it. Playing with other people and along to songs is my preferred way.

My writings on playing guitar => No B.S. Guitar


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

move to the music


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(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

Count.

This is the only correct answer

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

.


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(@kayo1111)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4
 

This is so true lol...just Count


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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

i never consciously count when i'm playing, and i've found that with some more complex, or syncopated, or extremely fast beats, trying to count and play is too much of a distraction, or pointless, and you really are better off feeling the beat.
nodding or swaying or dancing or tapping my foot all work better. you might be able to keep it mathematically "correct" by counting in your head, but that won't necessarily keep you in the groove. you really can't fake the feel of it, and that comes from your body, from dancing.


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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

I think that depends entirely on the line you're playing, Jason. While it's true that some rhythmic patterns - for example, septuplets - are much easier to 'feel' or imitate by ear than to count, lots of beginners and some intermediate players use that as an excuse for not counting at all, with a predictable result: they're not consistent. If can't be consistent, you can't have good rhythm. It's that simple.

I encourage my students to tap their foot (or feet), and to sway to the music. That's because it's easier to keep time if you have a steady motion to measure against. But that's not a substitute for counting either - not everything will neatly line up with the up-down of the foot. If you can't play "one-e[/e]-and-a-two" and always get the "e" in the same place, you can't play a syncopated sixteenth note rhythm. The more interesting the rhythm, the more important counting becomes.

The most basic element of having good rhythm is the ability to break a beat into divisions or subdivisions and play it correctly, whether that's in simple time (eighths/sixteenths) or compound time (triplet rhythms). The fastest way to do that is to count.

One of my teachers used to say "if you can't say it, you can't play it". While that's not literally true... it's darn close.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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