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 lars
(@lars)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

I've been working on recording my latest song lately.

And I have this same annoying experience as before

When I sit down to record something - I can do it like maybe 75% satisfactory on the first few takes. Then I listen to it and think (sometimes) - hey this was pretty good. :D

But then I start thinking I have to redo that and that part (lots of things on this last one - for instance severe unconcious foot tapping towards the end )

Strange thing then - I find it almost impossible to actually improve my playing - 10 more takes - and the foot tapping is gone, but the inspiration and feeling sucks. :?

What about the rest of you - you get nerves when you get from casual to "serious" recording?

lars

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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Lars, are you recording guitar and vocals in one take, or recording them separately?

In my earliest demos, I used to play the guitar and sing at the same time. What I do now is;

1 - record the basic track (let's call it track A) - guitar AND vocals.

2 - play track A back, and record track B - this time just concentrate on recording the guitar.

3 - mute track B, play back track A, and this time record track C - just the vocals.

4 - delete track A, leaving track B - guitar and track C - vocals.

5 - add other tracks - lead, bass, drums etc to tracks B and C.

This way, I find that instead of concentrating on guitar AND vocals at the same time, I can give 100% attention to each while recording separate tracks. Hope this helps - it certainly works for me! I know, it's a roundabout way of doing things - but I also find it helps, playing through the song a couple of times, to get into the mood, the feel and the rhythm of the song.

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

I don't think anybody is ever satisfied with a recording. I once read that John Lennon was dissatisfied with all of the Beatles recordings and would do them all over again if he could.

As you experienced, sometimes when you try to make a perfect recording you lose the fire and passion of the first recording or so. To me, fire and passion is far more important than perfection. As Duke Ellington wrote:

It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDQpZT3GhDg

And I read the Beatles would purposely leave mistakes in recordings because it made the songs more realistic and spontaneous sounding.

As a musician you must never let yourself get bored with your playing or a song, no matter how many times you play it. I recently saw Sting from the Police in an interview. The reporter said he must get bored with songs like Roxanne that they've played for over 20 years. Sting replied that they always try to play every song like they just learned it 15 minutes ago.

So, learn to live with a little imperfection in your recordings and go for the spontaneous passion.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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 lars
(@lars)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1121
Topic starter  

thanks -

Vic - on this one I did like this

click track
guitar 1 - rhythm
singing
guitar 2
perc.

The more I try to record tracks again, the worse they get

Wes - yes, there is something with spontaneousness (sp?) - but it can be too much too

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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you can always try it again tomorrow. you'll probably be fresh, plus all the practice from today will leave you sharper.


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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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lars, I think we all suffer a bit as you do. there are no perfect takes. once I understood that I felt more relaxed.
I noticed that when I know the song. really know it. so when the red light comes on I can play hard and sing hard. that's when good things happen. like Vic I create a scratch or timing track.
then I record guitar rhythm, vox, lead, bass etc.
listening to several takes on each track I rarely improve from one track to another. each track has some flaw.
the more I mess with htigns the more stale they become.
so now I am trying to keep it direct. one or two takes and that's what I deal with.

someday I may be really adept with my recording program. then I could have the perfect lead. I could clip very short parts and paste them all together to make the perfect track. but that seems a long way off. I would much rather play with my soul and leave it at that. flaws and all. ha, just like the Beatles. LOL

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
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Lars, I think you only use your guitar (and the voice) but if you add more tracks it is easier if you add them previously, I mean, the rhythmic section, guitar, lead/voice, other arrangements.

Initially I did it in the reverse order, first the lead guitar, the rhythm guitar, etc. playing against a metronome and it is harder! Long time ago, perhaps last year, when I started to record myself, I did a similar question and several members gave me that great advice.

I hope this helps.

Anyway, I have the same 'problem' but it is also true that every time I need less 'takes' and lately, sometimes, I can do it with just one take.


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
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And just a little something I've noticed - I always run through a song a couple of times anyway before I record it, but why is it that the last time you play the song BEFORE you hit the record button is always the best take? Ah, I hear you say, so why don't you press the record button earlier? Because then I wouldn't get a good take - must be Murphy's law of recording!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@blueline)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1705
 

I go through the same thing. I play a song and it sounds great. I hit all the notes I want, etc. As soon as I hit the record button, I'm all thumbs. I can't even strum the same way. Kinda like stage fright without the stage. Timing, accents, everything goes out the window.

Teamwork- A few harmless flakes working together can unleash an avalanche of destruction.


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(@jwmartin)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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... Sting from the Police in an interview. The reporter said he must get bored with songs like Roxanne that they've played for over 20 years.

I know when I saw Sting in 2003 (maybe '02), I got bored with "Roxanne". He did a solo acoustic version that was great, until about 2.5 minutes in, he just kept repeating "Rooooxxaaannnneee" over and over again. He turned a fast, catchy rock song into a 10 minute ordeal.

Bass player for Undercover


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(@jwmartin)
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I go through the same thing. I play a song and it sounds great. I hit all the notes I want, etc. As soon as I hit the record button, I'm all thumbs. I can't even strum the same way. Kinda like stage fright without the stage. Timing, accents, everything goes out the window.

I know the feeling. My "favorite" takes are when I hit record and the first note or chord I hit is wrong. I guess it's better than hitting the last note wrong after a great take.

Bass player for Undercover


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(@rparker)
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I get all tied up too. I'm never, ever perfect, but I'm no-where near as bad as my recordings.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


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 lars
(@lars)
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Topic starter  

Clearly not the only one then

Maybe that's one of the things that characterises a good producer - making folks relax? I remeber there is a great chapter about how Dan Lanois gets the best out of Dylan for his Oh Mercy! record in '89(?) in the "Chronicles" book

Thanks for your replies!

...only thing I know how to do is to keep on keepin' on...

LARS kolberg http://www.facebook.com/sangerersomfolk


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

I'm failry confident with recording nowadays. It was much worse a little while ago, tensing up as soon as I would hit the record button. I guess it just takes some time getting used to. Playing in front of others is the opposite for me, never did it much so it still freaks me out.


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(@dogbite)
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when I 'sing' now. I look into the mic and sing pretend I am singing in front of people. usually tho, I peek at the lyric sheet in one hand. I gesture with the other. it helps.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


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