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Electric Strings on an Acoustic?

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(@preacher)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 128
Topic starter  

Hey all, I have a 1965 Ensenada acoustic. I was wondering if it would hurt it if I put a set of 10s on it?

I play the guitar, I taught myself how to play the guitar, which was a bad decision... because I didn't know how to play it, so I was a sh***y teacher. I would never have went to me. -Mitch Hedberg


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(@tinsmith)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 830
 

Michael Hedges used to occasionally use a set of nickel, or steel.....medium guage on his acoustics for signal reasons....he thought he sound better though his pick ups.......I think

I think 10's are way to light for an acoustic....Just MHO.


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(@ballybiker)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 494
 

certainly wont do any harm to the guitar.....

but you will have issues like fretted notes sounding sharp unless you have the most delicate of touches 8)

what did the drummer get on his I.Q. test?....

Drool

http://www.myspace.com/ballybiker


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(@kingpatzer)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2198
 

It won't work very well.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

I have done it in an emergency. there was a loss of some quality; tone, feel; they just weren't the same.
maybe because the electricity in the electric strings had no where to go.
to be sure, with the correct gauge for an acoustic an electric set would not do harm.
do you live really far from store?

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
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(@preacher)
Estimable Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 128
Topic starter  

alright. thanks for the info. So it would be fine with a heavier gauge string like an 11 or 12?

I do live a pretty good way from the closest store (about a half hour drive). But another reason is Im broke at the moment, and have a gig tomorrow night in the opposite direction from the store. But thanks for the info yall!

I play the guitar, I taught myself how to play the guitar, which was a bad decision... because I didn't know how to play it, so I was a sh***y teacher. I would never have went to me. -Mitch Hedberg


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 Cat
(@cat)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1225
 

certainly wont do any harm to the guitar.....

but you will have issues like fretted notes sounding sharp unless you have the most delicate of touches 8)

This guy's right, Preacher Man! I use .009's on my Epiphone and my D35 with NO detriment whatsoever...other than a little loss of tone and volume...more so on the Martin. You're gonna need to SWAP (so you can put them back so DON'T file!!!) the nuts to fit the smaller gauge, however.

Cat

"Feel what you play...play what you feel!"


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

I use the same strings - D'Addario (electric) 9's - on my electric and my acoustic. Feel OK and sound OK on both to me - never had any problems at all. I usually buy 4-5 sets at a time - just pick up the next set whenever strings need changing on either.

Having said that, I often use a detachable pick-up on my acoustic - I don't know if it'd work with acoustic strings, but with electric strings I get a nice bright tone through my amp - maybe a bit trebly for some, but it suits me. I turn the bass and mids up to compensate, and the volume down a touch...

And having given you my two pennorth (or two cents worth) I'd advise you to experiment till you find A) The right gauge and B) the right tone for YOU!

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

I've got electric nickel 12s on my tricone reso at the moment.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3711
 

Electrics need to be magnetic to work well with pickups, but on an acoustic, anything goes.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


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 Cat
(@cat)
Noble Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1225
 

but on an acoustic, anything goes.

Okay...but how's THIS:

My B busted and we were sitting on the tailgate of my ute up on the hill behind us. Nope, no new strings anywhere. BUT...there was this huge rubber band that I hung around the gear shift lever so I cut it and tied both ends at bridge and tuner. (Yes...I was in a rather altered state at the time!) I couldn't get it tuned to a B no matter what...although it was sorta tunable as it was wrapped over the peg. It sorta stayed at a D...sounding JUST like a droning bagpipe.

Yep...anything GOES!

Cat

"Feel what you play...play what you feel!"


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

Electrics need to be magnetic to work well with pickups, but on an acoustic, anything goes.

'ceptin' : if you use a sound-hole pup in your acoustic, that will be magnetic and require appropriate stringing. however, these work with bronze and the various non-ferous acoustic string alloys because the unwounds and the cores of the wounds are steel. otoh nylons ... not so much.

-=tension & release=-


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

IMO you get better balance of the strings with a magnetic pickup if you use magnetically wound electric strings instead of the steel cored bronze wound ones.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

IMO you get better balance of the strings with a magnetic pickup if you use magnetically wound electric strings instead of the steel cored bronze wound ones.

from experience?

my admittedly untested assumption is that Fishman and other more sophisticated pup makers probably design their magnetic soundhole pups with a string-to-string loudness balance optimized for acoustic (bronze/bronze-alloy wound) strings. wouldn't that make more sense if most acoustic players use "acoustic" strings? and it's not a difficult compensation to build into the design. If they don't ... I'd be surprised.

-=tension & release=-


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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7850
 

I've just got one Fishman, and it works better with electric strings. I can't imagine how a simple passive electromagnetic pickup could be designed to compensate for the reduced magnetic mass of nonmagnetically wound strings, but fortunately our hearing is nonlinear enough that the apparent difference isn't as big as you might think.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


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