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Good book for sight reading

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 vink
(@vink)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Topic starter  

Can anyone recommend a good book for learning sight reading specifically for the guitar?

(I already know all the note names for the first few positions pertty well, and I know how to "transcribe" standard notation into note positions in my head as I study it.)

Thanks!

--vink
"Life is either an adventure or nothing" -- Helen Keller


   
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(@goodvichunting)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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Mel Bay's Guitar Method Grade 1 and Hal Leonard's Guitar Method Book 1 come to mind. I prefer Hal Leonard's as it comes with a CD.

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(@kingpatzer)
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If you already know the notes and how to play them but you just need to work on sight reading skill then Leavitt's "Reading STudies For Guitar" and "Advanced Reading Studies for Guitar" are very good.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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(@ebuchednezzar)
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I just bought the complete Leavitt Method, and even in the first few pages I've found my reading skills have improved greatly. This is coming from an absolute beginner as far as reading goes though, so results will definitely vary. In my post about the book though people had good things to say about its reading instruction though.

"There's no easy ways man," he said. "You gotta learn the hard parts for yourself."


   
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(@kingpatzer)
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The "Reading Studies" books are NOT the Method book. They are just what the title says -- reading studies.

The Method book is also a good source of material for reading, but frankly, I if that's all you're looking for, I think you get more value for your dollar with the Reading Studies books. If you need the additional instructional material, however, the method book is very good.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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(@ebuchednezzar)
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Ah, I see now.

"There's no easy ways man," he said. "You gotta learn the hard parts for yourself."


   
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(@noteboat)
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If you already know how to read, and you're looking to get better at it, the solution is to read a LOT of music. You want new stuff on your music stand all the time - if you play a piece a few times, you'll be remembering it more than you'll be reading it.

For reading practice, it's hard to beat fake books. They're expensive, at $20-50 each, but you get hundreds - sometimes more than a thousand - different tunes.

Fake books for vocals will have tunes with a range of an octave or a tenth, so you should be able to play them in at least 3-4 different positions. Books of instrumentals, like jazz pieces, will have a little broader range, but you'll get at least 2 different position drills out of most of them. So something like "The Ultimate Jazz Fake BooK" ($40, about 625 tunes) will give you a couple thousand 'exercises'... at roughly 2 cents each. On top of that, you can hang on to the fake books for gigs - you can get them for blues, jazz, country, rock, pop, folk, standards, etc.

Don't overlook your local library either. They've probably got dozens, maybe hundreds, of sheet music books. Most will be for piano, but you can use any C instrument - and if you're not going to play a tune with others, you can use any treble clef music. Feel free to read stuff for violin, clarinet, flute, saxophone... the more the merrier.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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 vink
(@vink)
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Topic starter  

If you already know the notes and how to play them but you just need to work on sight reading skill then Leavitt's "Reading STudies For Guitar" and "Advanced Reading Studies for Guitar" are very good.

That sounds like what I need. I do know the notes and how to play them what I really want to work on is sight reading skills. I looked at the Mel Bay method grade 1, and it looked like it may be a bit too basic.
If you already know how to read, and you're looking to get better at it, the solution is to read a LOT of music.

Well, I "know" how to read, I really have to put that in quotes. I can look at the notes and work them out, but I have to analyze it -- that is, I have to go back to "Every Good Boy Does Fine" if the notes jump around or they are above or below the staff, so I don't think I am really good enough for this step yet. However, knowing several blues or jazz tunes does sound very good to me, but I think I have to get a little more proficient at reading first.

Thanks for all the advice!

--vink
"Life is either an adventure or nothing" -- Helen Keller


   
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