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more difficult double stop bends

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(@patrick)
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In my tab, during the solo I have to bend the second string (fifth fret) and the third string (7th fret) simultaneously up one step. If the notes were on the same fret I could do that, but I can't figure out a finger placement for this one.

Using the index and ring finger to push the strings up seems the most obvious way, but those fingers spread apart if I push up with them (can't 'lock' them together during the bend). Maybe there is some way to add support with a third finger or do a barre? How would anyone else do this bend? Thanks.


   
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(@patrick)
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Due to the lack of responses, I wonder if double-stop bends 2 frets apart are not encountered very often?


   
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 cnev
(@cnev)
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I don't know how common they are but normally you should use more than one finger to bend. In this case though I don't think you can so I'd use the index for the 2nd string (5th fret) and the middle and ring for the 3rd string (7th fret). That's just me though

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(@noteboat)
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You could also try other fingering options. One of the big downsides of tab is that it shows you only ONE way to get the notes, and there are almost always several ways to do something. If one approach is too difficult, another might work (although you typically need to refinger the whole phrase to avoid odd leaps).

For example, you could try playing the E on the 9th fret of the 3rd string, and the D on the 12th fret of the 4th string. Or you could even fret the D where it is (7th fret, 3rd string), use hybrid picking to play the E as an open first string, and bend the E as a behind the nut bend with your picking hand while you bend the D as you normally would.

Figuring out other ways to do things is part of what makes the guitar so interesting as an instrument - you don't get to make those choices on a piano!

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(@patrick)
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Thank you cnev and Note...
You know, I feel silly. I asked this same question on another guitar forum where I could attach a pic of the tab. It turns out I was reading the tab wrong. I thought the single 'bend up' arrow applied to both strings in the double stop because the arrow originated about halfway between both notes. It actually only applies to the 3rd string, which is bent upward a whole step to match the pitch of the 2nd string. I found out this is called a unison bend.

I guess that if both strings in a double stop are to be bent, the arrow will always have two stems to show this. Doh!


   
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