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Beatles I saw Her standing there


(@lineagecreed)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 40
Topic starter  

Hey all, I am currently working on this classic

E7 A7 E7

Well she was just seventeen and you know what I mean

B7

And the way she looked was way beyond compare

E E7 A7 C7

So how could I dance with another oh,

E7 B7 E7

when I saw her standing there

E7 A7 E7

Well she looked at me and I, I could see

B7

That before too long I'd fall in love with her

E E7 A7

She wouldn't dance with another

C7 E7 B7 E7

Oh, when I saw her standing there

A7

Well my heart went boom when I crossed that room

B7 A7

and I held her hand in mine

E7

Well we danced through the night

A7 E7

and we held each other tight

B7

And before too long I fell in love with her

E E7 A7

Now I'll never dance with another

C7 E6 B7 E7

Oh, since I saw her standing there

E7 B7 E7

Since I saw her standing there

E7 E7 B7 E7

Yeah, Well since I saw her standing there

here are the chords

E7(020100)
E (022100)
A7(x02020)
B7(x21202)
C7(x32310)

does anyone know the strumming pattern?

thx!

and thx rodders for helping me out for the code, it actully looks right now. I'm def a beatles fan, but can just play their easy ones right now


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(@rodders)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1094
 

Hooray, another Beatles fan or is it just this particular track? Welcome to guitarnoise lineagecreed.

You need to copy and paste your original draft of this and use the code option at the top of the message box by clicking "code" and paste it in and then click "code*" then and your chords will line up over the words as they did on your draft.

Go on give it another go you'll be glad you did.

Be excellent to each other & party on dudes!
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=686668


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(@vic-lewis-vl)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 10340
 

That's not too far out, lineagecreed....I've seen quite a few different versions of this, but most of them have a minor chord in this sequence....

So (E) how could I (E7)dance with a(A)nother (Am)oh,
when (E)I saw her (B)standing E)there....

Then back to the 7th's for the verse....

I love this song, I think originally it started with C, so you might need a capo on the 8th fret....

I also love the version Elton John & Lennon did way back in the 70's (about 74?) on the B-Side of Lucy in The Sky, I think....

Lennon's intro.....

"I'd like to thank Elton & the boys for having me here tonight....we tried to think of a number to finish off with so's I could get out of here and be sick....and we thought we'd do an old Beatles song, it's one I never sang, written by an old estranged fiance of mine called Paul...and it goes something like this..."

Well - something like that anyway...I haven't heard it for a while.....

:D :D :D

Vic

"Sometimes the beauty of music can help us all find strength to deal with all the curves life can throw us." (D. Hodge.)


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(@lineagecreed)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 40
Topic starter  

any idea on the strumming pattern for this great song vic?


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(@bob-squires)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 201
 

Try

No upstroke on the first beat.

No downstroke on the third however move your hand in as if you are going to strum the third count to keep the rythm and then upstroke on the 'and'.

I found this works well with many tunes of the era.

Good Luck :)

BS


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(@dogsbody)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 726
 

Hey lineaqecreed,

Welcome from me too. Good post!

The number one song from the Beatles first album "Please Please Me" (and in my book anyway) one of their best. I'll have a lot of fun trying this one out.

Cheers,

Chris

The guitar is all right John but you'll never make a living out of it! (John Lennon's Aunt Mimi)


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(@the-slithy-tove)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 11
 

For anyone interested in the chords that Lennon actually played, here they are:

E7 (x-7-6-7-5-x)
A (x-x-7-6-5-5) or (x-7-7-6-5-5)
B7 (7-9-7-8-10-7)
C (x-3-5-5-5-3) or (x-3-5-5-5-3)

For the Bridge, he plays a Chuck Berry type boogie pattern (Well, my heart went boom...)

A5 - A5 - A6 - A5

7 7 9 7
5 5 5 5

B5 - B5 - B6 - B5

9 9 11 9
7 7 7 7

As far as strumming pattern, I think he just plays a basic down up down up, with a heavy accent on the second down (while Harrison plays the emellishments that are much easier to hear).


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(@virgo65)
Active Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 15
 

It is possible to explain the strumming patterns for the verses,chorus ,bridge and solo ? (acoustic guitar )


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(@davidhodge)
Member Moderator
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 4485
 

It's certainly possible.

If I remember correctly, there are two guitar parts on the original recording, both electric. The second guitar part is, for the most part, playing all eighth notes throughout the entire song with the exception of the first part of the chorus (the "how could I dance with another oh" part) where it plays single quarter notes and the tail end of the guitar solo where it plays a rhythm similar (but not exactly the same) to what the first guitar plays through the verses of the song. Also (again if memory serves correctly) the second guitar doesn't play full chords but rather a riff-like phrase involving single notes on the low E and A strings as well as the occasional double stop of the second frets on both the A and D strings.

The first guitar part is the rhythm that most people hear when listening to the song. If you count out the beat (four beats per measure) while listening to it, you can hear the guitar being played on the second and third beats as well as on the offbeat between the third and fourth beat, like this:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
* * *

If you strum your guitar evenly, playing downstrokes on the beats and upstrokes on the offbeats, like this:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
D U D U D U D U

Then you'll find the the strumming of this guitar rhythm plays out this way:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
* * *
D D U

Of course, listening to the song you'll also hear that the guitarist does a few variations on this rhythm. After all, people are not machines and don't feel the need to play one particular pattern throughout an entire song. Sometimes the first beat will be added:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
* * * *
D D D U

And sometimes the offbeat between the fourth beat of one measure and the first beat of the next is added:
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
* * * * *
D D D U U

This basic pattern (and its variations) are played throughout the verse and the first part of the chorus. In the second half of the chorus (the "I saw her standing there" part) it simply plays on the second and fourth beat.

On the bridge the first guitar drops completely out, leaving the second guitar alone with its all-eighth note patern. You can simply strum all eighth notes or continue with the original first guitar rhythm as it works fine during this section of the song as well. Likewise with the guitar solo as it is played over the structure of the verse / chorus (albeit with a simpler chord progression).

By the way, all this is very easy to do on one's own - here's a lesson we have here at Guitar Noise on this very topic:

https://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/getting-past-up-and-down-part-2/

Hope this all helps. Remember that rhythm is all about counting and you should be able to work out any strum that you fancy.

Peace


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(@clideguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 376
 

I like to throw in alot of palm muting except for parts of the chorus. I can't give you any specific timing....
it's like you (David) try to teach and just play with it sometimes. It adds pizzaz (sp?) when your just playing E7 - A7 - B7.


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