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On the right track?

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Steve-0
(@steve-0)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Topic starter  

I figured since there have been so many modal questions on this forum I'd ask some of my own. I've been trying to teach myself some basic uses for modes in the context of a chord progression, my question is this: if i have a major progression like this:

G major // D major // C major

could you change modes by making that a mixolydian progression like so:

G major// D minor // C major

Since D minor contains the flatted 7th of the G major scale, this would make it part of the mixolydian tonality (i'm assuming).

Similarly, for a descending minor progression like in Stairway to Heaven or All along the watchtower:

A minor // G major // F major

could you change it to a phygian mode and make it:

A minor // G minor // F major

I just want to make sure I'm on the right track here, and i'm not really that interested in playing modal jazz or anything, i'd just like to make sure i have a decent understanding of what i'm doing here.

Steve-0


   
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paul donnelly
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You couldn't change modes by changing the chord progression. Modes are strictly melodic, and are not impacted by harmony. Harmony may help determine the mode you decide to use, but you can play in any mode you like over any progression (although it may sound strange). You establish a mode by harping on its defining features, as you have noticed. But you have to do it in the melody. Since modes are melodic, we don't consider a chord progression to be in a mode. That means that playing in a particular mode won't make the harmony be in that mode.


   
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Steve-0
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Interesting, seems like I have a bit more to learn about this sort of thing :lol: Actually I've been interested in buying some good, more advanced theory and harmony books (or just find a good website, but i think that's tough to find). Anyone know of some good theory/harmony books or websites (preferably some more advanced stuff, i pretty much know the basics)

Steve-0


   
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Alex_
(@alex_)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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I wouldnt buy books, one think ive learnt, is you learn from here..

if you buy a book, you mightnt understand it, or it might be confusing, as lots of theory books are.

Wheras here, you ask, explain, see if you have it right, then people will pick up on something, give examples, until you explain it and someone says "Yep, you got it"..

You ever wanted to know something, read an explanation and thought "WHAT?" and you need people to go over it a few times.


   
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PsYcHoNIK
(@psychonik)
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Posts: 268
 

piston's "harmony" and "counterpoint" are known to be among the best


   
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Alex_
(@alex_)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 608
 

but as soon as you start reading, it, it wont make any sense unless you come here and ask about it, and then understand it, which, if you like doing that, you could.


   
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Steve-0
(@steve-0)
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Topic starter  

but as soon as you start reading, it, it wont make any sense unless you come here and ask about it, and then understand it, which, if you like doing that, you could.

It seems like you're speaking from personal experience :lol: , I figure i might pick up a book about harmony or counterpoint (a good one) and then I can always come back and ask any questions I have. I just think that getting a book would be a good idea, because there may be things I may not understand, but there will definitly be stuff that I do understand and i'll be able to get alot more done if i have a book then if i don't (in my opinion).

Steve-0


   
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Nick Torres
(@nicktorres)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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Scroll back through the pages a bit and take a look for really long threads

there is an entire theory book in there.


   
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Steve-0
(@steve-0)
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Topic starter  

I can do that.

Steve-0


   
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PsYcHoNIK
(@psychonik)
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after a while publishing companies are going to ask for royalties on all the excripts made here lol.
Ive been looking for good theory books around here but music stores tend to lean towards the less serious musician around here :(
"100 top rock licks" and stuff like that. even in the piano stores... "jazz piano method"
all stuff i can figure out myself (well not so much the jazz pano method and stuff lie that but you get the idea) whereas i could be studying actual concepts that i can apply in my own contexts.


   
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undercat
(@undercat)
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Scroll back through the pages a bit and take a look for really long threads

there is an entire theory book in there.

Um... well, a "for dummies" book with a really big editorial section... :D

There really is a lot here, however, there's no system to it. If you get a book, look for one that organizes the topics in a logical order, that's the real trick: building theory on top of other theory rather than trying to dive into without knowing the basic assumptions.

Do something you love and you'll never work a day in your life...


   
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hbriem
(@hbriem)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 646
 

The articles in the Theory section here at Guitarnoise offer a full and fairly comprehensive theory course that leads you by baby steps from your first chord.

Unfortunately, they are not arranged in the correct order any more.

Here is a start:

Theory Without Tears
The Power of Three
Five to One
You Say You Want a Resolution...
Minor Progress

After that, read the rest of the articles in any order you like.

I hope this helps someone.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
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Steve-0
(@steve-0)
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Topic starter  

Thanks, I think I have a good grip on basic theory, the 4 years of music class that i've taken in high school has really helped with that. I guess what I REALLY want to do is to start writing songs (and quality guitar solos), I guess I just assumed I need a better understanding of theory to do that. I'm learning alot of classical (acoustic) guitar and jazz guitar which has helped me put all the theory i know together, and lately i've been looking at and even emulating some of the solos that i like from the greats: Jimmy Page, SRV, Kirk Hammett, etc.

Oh, and I talked to my friend who took piano lessons and she said that she might have some theory books for me, which would be a plus. However, other then a few subjects I think i have a good grip on theory, i just think it'd be interesting to learn more about harmony and counterpoint and more advanced topics like that.

Steve-0


   
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