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When Soloing


(@coolnama)
Honorable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 595
Topic starter  

When I am soloing on whatever scale of whatever progression, can I use intervals ( I think thats what we call them).

For example I'm playing in the Minor Pentatonic you know that on the E string and B string its 1-4 1-4 ( finger wise).
So can I put my 1st finger in the 1st fret B string and 4th fret E string and play them both at the same time ( interval right, like a powerchord ).

I Already played around with this earlier but wanted to know if people normally use this ?

I wanna be that guy that you wish you were ! ( i wish I were that guy)

You gotta set your sights high to get high!

Everyone is a teacher when you are looking to learn.

( wise stuff man! )

Its Kirby....


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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8306
 

you can do whatever you want. you'll get the sound of that interval (in this case a minor 6th). if you like it there, then it's good. if not, then it's bad. sometimes, you might want that sound. sometimes, it'll be badly out of place. if the chord you're playing over has those two notes (A flat major, for instance. or d flat maj7), it may sound right, or it may sound right in the context of your solo due to the lead in and lead out from the notes. experience and an attentive ear will tell you when it's ok to use certain notes or combinations of notes.

playing two notes at a time is called a "double stop". they're pretty common.


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(@bfloyd6969)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 91
 

Yes, double stops are used time and time again, and they sound great - i.e. Chuck Berry.

Why do we have to get old...


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Yea like bfloyd said double stops are used all the time for soloing and they sound a bit fuller than single notes

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@coolnama)
Honorable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 595
Topic starter  

So does the double bend work this way as well, just do a double stop and bend it ?

I wanna be that guy that you wish you were ! ( i wish I were that guy)

You gotta set your sights high to get high!

Everyone is a teacher when you are looking to learn.

( wise stuff man! )

Its Kirby....


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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yes

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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(@bfloyd6969)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 91
 

yes

And it sounds really cool too. You can also hold one of the strings stable and bend the other one. Of corse you will have to use two fingers for this - one stays still and the other one bends. Try all different variations...

Why do we have to get old...


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(@coolnama)
Honorable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 595
Topic starter  

Yeah I hear alot of people use those bends to start a solo, and it sounds nice, I'll guess I'll have to try it.

I wanna be that guy that you wish you were ! ( i wish I were that guy)

You gotta set your sights high to get high!

Everyone is a teacher when you are looking to learn.

( wise stuff man! )

Its Kirby....


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(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 5599
 

You can even include chords in a solo. Playing single notes all the time tends to be boring. Throw some chords in your solo, they add variety.

Here is a great video by Ted Nugent. Look how he throws chords in his solo at 2:55

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRiw4vZxSj4

He was playing a 7th chord there. This song is in A, he was playing a D7 shaped chord on 3 strings with his index finger at the 8th fret which makes an A7 chord. Stevie Ray Vaughan also used many chords in his solos.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


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