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Wishing I could play like Stevie and Jimi

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(@uptownskateshop)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 30
Topic starter  

If you can, show me how. Practice is not enough for me, well maybe it is and im just practicing wrong. I've been playing for nearly 3 years now and the first song I've ever tried to learn never finishing it note for note (little Wing, kind of a difficult song for my first song). I can play it well enough that family and friends dont cover their ears, but I do not play it well enough to satisfy me. it's just the little things stevie and Jimi do that I can't grab. For the past 3 years I've been soloing and scaling in the pentitonic scales, normally 5th postion and so on, I add some flats at times turning the pent scale into a major scale. there are some theory things I still have yet to learn regarding the extra notes they add to their keys and why those certain notes work and some don't. Point me in the Right Direction.


   
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(@teleplayer324)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1506
 

It seems like you are going in the right direction without even being aware of it. You are adding your own touches, your own sense of what the song should be to it.
Why exactly do you want to copy the song note for note exactly as they played it? They've already done it the way, if you want to hear it note for note you can just put the guitar in the corner and listen to the record.
Now this is just my opinion mind you, but I think part of maturing as a musician is to stop slavishly copying someone else and do just what you're doing, putting your own stamp on the music.

Immature? Of course I'm immature Einstein, I'm 50 and in a Rock and ROll band.

New Band site http://www.myspace.com/guidedbymonkeys


   
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(@uptownskateshop)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 30
Topic starter  

Why exactly do you want to copy the song note for note exactly as they played it? They've already done it the way, if you want to hear it note for note you can just put the guitar in the corner and listen to the record

I'll explain. I want to learn how to play it note for note so I can understand why they play it the way they do. It's not that I want to play exacly like they do, because that is near impossible, even if I could I wouldnt because to me it's just not moral (for a lack of a better term). I am essentailly talking technique, I want their technique. That is simply the direction I want to be pointed in. I remember I tried to consult a guitar teacher about this, and he could only help me to a certain extent. It also depends on the guitar teacher, maybe I should look for a new one with more experience with blues and jazz?

I've become obsessed with blues, and electric church music. I just wish I could play it effeciently as Stevie and Jimi do.


   
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(@teleplayer324)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1506
 

So, you're doing it as a learning excersize, that makes sense.
One thing I can suggest then is a book by Kenn Chipkin called Real BLues GUitar. It comes with a cd of all the examples in the book and has some very good examples of SRV's style along with other blues greats such as T-Bone Walker, BB, Johnny Winter and Clapton

Immature? Of course I'm immature Einstein, I'm 50 and in a Rock and ROll band.

New Band site http://www.myspace.com/guidedbymonkeys


   
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(@mr_clean001)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 88
 

I think having a goal is great, but I have to agree with Tele here....put your own touches on it. But - if you really want to play it note for note the only thing I can recommend is practice. Now keep in mind, I am new at this, so maybe someone else has better advice than I can give out...but again....practice.

Sorry - no amazing words of wisdom here.

"Practice until you get a guitar welt on your chest...if it makes you
feel good, don't stop until you see the blood from your fingers.
Then you'll know you're on to something!"
- Ted Nugent


   
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(@metallicaman)
Honorable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 312
 

Yea i felt the same way. I wonder sometimes how van halen, and zakk do it. its pretty crazy. But like teleplayer said you should practice someof oyur own stuff. You think its hard playing there stuff, sit down with a guitar and try to make your own rock song and solo that sound good and perfect it like they do theres! Want practice try that. lol

Sing Me A Song Your a Singer, Do me a wrong, your a bringer of evil. - Dio


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Can we hear a bit of your OWN work on the guitar :wink:


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
Famed Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2811
 

Guys, he wants to learn about their technique, so he can improve his own. He isn't doing it just so he can play the song note for note.

I don't have much to add. Maybe what could help (it helped me) is to watch lots of videos of the artists your talking about. SEE what they are doing, and HEAR it as well. You can pick up on a lot of tricks this way.

One of SRV's main distinctions is the way he deadens all the strings but the one he wants to play, and he can use a very sloppy picking attack, that add's a percussive sound. Also look at his first finger vibrato. It's very wide, and he's only using one finger.

With SRV and Jimi, it's not ALWAYS the notes they played, but sometimes its HOW they played them that sets them apart.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@rip-this-joint)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 110
 

I dont buy this nonsense of add your own touches for beginning/and even more advanced beginners (1-3years depending on progress). How can anyone REALLY do theirselves any good by adding in things when they simply dont know why they should or are adding them. I think the best way to develop is to just listen to the CD with a tab, or without a tab. The latter will result in more skills obviously. Then just work through the song VERY slowly, it can get pretty boring but it really does pay off in the long run. You really gotta LISTEN to the cd, and really make sure you get all the rhythmic nuiances.


   
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(@uptownskateshop)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 30
Topic starter  

So, you're doing it as a learning excersize, that makes sense.
One thing I can suggest then is a book by Kenn Chipkin called Real BLues GUitar. It comes with a cd of all the examples in the book and has some very good examples of SRV's style along with other blues greats such as T-Bone Walker, BB, Johnny Winter and Clapton

I have the book, learned texas flood from it. it's a decent guide, I will continue to try to learn from it.
Yea i felt the same way. I wonder sometimes how van halen, and zakk do it. its pretty crazy. But like teleplayer said you should practice someof oyur own stuff. You think its hard playing there stuff, sit down with a guitar and try to make your own rock song and solo that sound good and perfect it like they do theres! Want practice try that. lol

I can sit down anytime and write a rock song along solos. It's strictly an emphasis of style and technique that SRV and jimi have a tendency use that I would like to implement in my guitar playing. Such as Double stops, guitar humping, and string nibbling. ect.. I was just curious if any of you might have a link or any helpful advice that may better my guitar playing in terms of legendary technique. Of course I was kiddng about the string nibbling and guitar humping, (I already know that stuff :P ) I would even appreciate some theory links explaining the extra notes in blues progresions SRV and jimi uses but are not noted on scales.

It's great to finally use my account to gather some great info that has the potential to better me musically.


   
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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5582
 

uptownskateshop

I can relate to how you feel. When I first started playing guitar Hendrix was my idol. I literally spent months trying to learn his solos note for note, and trying to capture all the little nuances that really set him apart from everyone else. I know exactly what you are talking about.

I can tell you from experience that this is good and bad. It was good because I really learned how to play some WILD lead guitar. The bad was that I felt I sounded JUST LIKE Hendrix.

So, I ended up listening to other artists to try and get the Hendrix out of my playing. To this day I sound very much like Jimi on lead guitar.

What you are looking for cannot be found in a book. It is not theory either.

It is PASSION.

That may sound like a simple answer, but that is the answer.

You have got to totally let go and play with your deepest feelings. Then you will sound like Hendrix, SRV, or any super-great. You have to get into the sound so much you become mesmerized by it.

This may sound off the wall, but I'm telling you this is what they did.

Now, there is one more thing. In order to truly let go like this you must have confidence. You must play guitar so much that it almost becomes part of you. You must be able to play what you hear in your head. It is constant practice that gives you this confidence.

So all I can tell you is play guitar all the time. You have to immerse yourself in it. This is what Hendrix and Stevie did.

Play with fire and passion. Make the sounds you need to hear.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

SRV and Jimi both, as with most well known artist, were influenced by much earlier artist and in thier early learning emulated them. they then because of skill, comfort in doing certain things, or whatever developed this into thier own style.
If you really want to learn what and why then you have to go back much farther than SRV and Jimi and see what led them to their styles.


   
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(@yoyo286)
Noble Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 1681
 

It is PASSION
8) Yup.

Stairway to Freebird!


   
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(@rip-this-joint)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 110
 

I'll also agree on the passion. Sometimes i find myself in a jam and almost 'subconsiously' an amazing solo will appear. It as though i have let something greater take over and do the playing for me. Of course passion can only take you so far, but being in that mindstate is really a golden moment. I also think this only happens when you are in your most relaxed state of mind, with no worries but the music.


   
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 Mike
(@mike)
Famed Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 2892
 

SRV and Jimi both, as with most well known artist, were influenced by much earlier artist and in thier early learning emulated them.

Yes, 100%, but I'll add, Jimi WAS SRV's major influence. Think about that one! :D


   
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