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Music Man amplifier

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(@rpcruab)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

I have owned a Music Man 65W 2-12 amplifier from the late 70's for a few years now and noticed that the tone and character of the amp has slowly deteriorated. When I purchased the amp I was surprised because of the lack of clean, clear, headroom I was expecting as well. I think that the speakers are fine but I am considering replacing them. I have never worked on this amplifier besides changing tubes and just had a few inexperienced questions. Any advice would be appreciated!

1. What are some basic/common steps I could take to restore this amp and "tighten the screws" so to speak.

2. If I were to change the speakers, what type would be desirable in this amplifier? It has the original 2-12 Alnico (18) speakers in it now.

3. Is the entire process going to break my wallet? I'm hoping to bypass my local guitar/amp repair man because of unsatisfactory work and high prices.

Thanks for you time
Ryan Chandler


   
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(@rpcruab)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

By the way, I didn't know if this was the appropriate section to post this. I am new to the forum and figured this passed as guitar players discussion.


   
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(@prndl)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 199
 

If this is a tube amp, most likely the electrolytics are failing and need to be replaced (it's called a "cap job").

Old Alnicos are highly desirable speakers. Modern speakers are designed to replicate their sound, and a few come close.

I recommend bringing the amp to a reputable tube amp repairman for service.
Let me know if you can't find one nearby - I know one that many people mail their amps to (the chassis only to save on shipping).
Is the entire process going to break my wallet? I'm hoping to bypass my local guitar/amp repair man because of unsatisfactory work and high prices.
Unfortunately, this is a common experience. Good tube amp techs are rare, and tube amp repair is a highly skilled trade.

A cap job is usually about $150. It may also need new tubes, which would increase that.

I recommend calling Larry Rodgers at (239) 649-8799
http://www.naturdoctor.com/Chapters/Rodgers/RodgersAmps.html

1 watt of pure tube tone - the Living Room Amp!
http://www.naturdoctor.com/Chapters/Amps/LivingRoomAmp.html
Paper-in-oil caps rule!


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Most likely reason for gradually deteriorating tone and output is the "power tubes" wearing out.

Filter capacitors do go bad. Usual symptom is an increasingly bad hum.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@rpcruab)
Eminent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

thanks a lot for the advice! It is appreciated. I live in an extremely rural area and just may give that fellow a call, thanks for the reference.


   
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