Skip to content
Are these chords in...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Are these chords in the same key?

8 Posts
5 Users
0 Likes
1,069 Views
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

I'm talking about bar chords here and I'm going from....G to F to A to B...it sounds good to me. But am I correct in what I'm doing here?

But now the question is...what key am I in? G, because that's the first chord I'm playing? If so, what lead notes can I play over this? Do I just take the G scale and use all those box formations from there?

Any advice/help would be appreciated. Thanks.


   
Quote
(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Songs don't have to stay in the same key. If it sounds good, do it.

G and F occur together only in the key signature of C; A and B happen together only in the key of E.

Whether your song is in one key or not depends on a lot of things - how long each sound is, where they fall (on downbeats, other beats, or in between), etc. But at least one chord is an "accidental" chord - one that needs one or more notes from outside the key.

So no, the chords are not all in the same key, and there's no one scale that's going to work over everything... the only notes that will work over every chord in your progression are A, B, E, and G (four notes are usually not enough to make a scale for soloing).

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
ReplyQuote
(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

Now thats the kind of advice I like! And from a real teacher none the less. I'm a big "If it sounds good do it" fan. :D I don't like to color inside the lines. :roll: I'm a little weak on music theory but am ever so steadily learning a little at a time. Isn't it good to have somebody that really knows it well to ask this stuff? 8)

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
ReplyQuote
(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 5381
 

Not to go way off course here, but can't the minor second and third play substitute? ....and the dim seventh?

I'm just wondering if Kevin means a true barre chord or a power chord. If none of the shaping tonal characteristics come into play, then it seems to me that they all can be in the key of G or any other for that matter.

But of course you are correct Noteboat, if it sounds good go play it.


   
ReplyQuote
(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Nick, 2nds are poor substitutes - they don't share any notes in common with the tonic. It wouldn't be in G either - it's got an F chord... which means it can't be in one key, even if they're all power chords - a B power chord has F# in it.

But if they are all power chords, you'd have the notes A-B-C-E-F-F#-G, so there are some scales you could use for soloing... these come to mind:

A pentatonic minor (A-C-D-E-G)
E pentatonic minor (E-G-A-B-D)
G melodic minor (G-A-B-C-D-E-F-F#-G-G#)

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
ReplyQuote
(@nicktorres)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 5381
 

If I could learn to count I would've gotten that F#.

But there Kevin, if you aren't playing full barres Noteboat 's scale suggestions are great.

You should check out David's chord lessons, like you say you want a resolution, five to one, etc. They are easy to read and answer a lot of your questions.


   
ReplyQuote
(@kevin72790)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 837
Topic starter  

Thank you very much guys. I'll try out those notes, Noteboat.

Nick, well...I'm not really playing full bar chords. I'm playing it the "Hendrix way". With thumb over the top, A string muted, high e string muted (unless I lay down the first finger to change the sound up and add interest, which I am doing occasionally). I think switching to power chords would add interest and sound good as well at times.

And of course if it sounds good play it. ;) The main reason I asked is because I have a hard time finding a key. I don't completely understand that at all, so I wouldn't understand whats notes to play on the fretboard that would likely sound good. :)

Thanks again. :D :D


   
ReplyQuote
(@hbriem)
Honorable Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 646
 

As usual in rock, G major/mixolydian, i.e. G major with an added b7 note and bVII chord (F). Probably the commonest rock/blues key of them all.

--
Helgi Briem
hbriem AT gmail DOT com


   
ReplyQuote