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Combining Scale Cages?

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(@Anonymous)
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I am working on the Major scale right now using this format below. My question is how do I combine the cages together? Do go up the first cage then down the other or do I go up AND down the first cage then repeat the rest the same way?

Or are you going to tell me "Whatever you prefer...that's how you make music!!" :roll: :roll:

Thanks!
|---------------------------2-3-5-|
|-----------------------3-5-------|
|-----------------2-4-5-----------|
|-----------2-4-5-----------------|
|-----2-3-5-----------------------|
|-3-5-----------------------------|

Scale 2
|-----------------------------5-7-8-|
|-----------------------5-7-8-------|
|-----------------4-5-7-------------|
|-----------4-5-7-------------------|
|-------5-7-------------------------|
|-5-7-8-----------------------------|

Scale site: http://www.guitarnoise.us/scales/scale_tabs.htm


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Or are you going to tell me "Whatever you prefer...that's how you make music!!"

Yes :)

Actually, when you practice scales, the up/down part is just the beginning. You'll use scale notes all the time, but you won't rip through a scale very often during a solo, so it's more about learning the notes as a set.

Once you have the scale memorized, make up patterns that skip around. In C, you might do:

CDEDEFEFG etc
CEDCDFEDEGFE etc
CEDFEGFA etc

that'll get your fingers (and ears) used to scales in a more 'practical' context.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@Anonymous)
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AHHH...so basically there really isn't a definite way of doing the WHOLE Major scale up and down the fretboard? Unless of course I create my own..

Thanks Note


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Ah - extending beyond the range of a single pattern.

Sure, there are lots of ways. The one you pick depends on how far you want to go.

For instance, if you're starting with a 5th string root on the second finger, you'll only get to the sixth note in the second octave. If you want to run two full octaves, you'll have to shift up three frets at some point. Most people will shift on the treble strings - usually on the first or second - but you can move on any string.

If you're so inclined, you can do a three-octave scale. That's going to run 12 frets up from a 6th string root - so you'll have several shifts. Some teachers call these 'diagonal scale patterns' because you're headed on a diagonal - low on the 6th string to high on the 1st.

Maybe you start with first finger on the 6th string, and begin by sliding it up two frets to get the next note. Use your third finger for the third note - it's right there - then slide up two more frets. Now you've got the fifth note right under your pinky, so play that and then switch strings.

If you started in F, you're now in fifth position - frets 5-8 are under your fingers. Since you need to get to fret 13 for the third octave F, you'll need one or two more shifts... just pick the strings you'll do them on, and go from there. There are lots of possible diagonal scale fingerings, though - instead of trying to learn them all, learn the notes on the fretboard, and the notes that belong in each scale. Then you'll have the freedom to switch wherever and whenver you want, without worrying about fingering patterns.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@Anonymous)
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OK Note...you're speaking Greek again :? ! I haven't gotten that far into theory to really understand what you just wrote...sorry I'm a visual learner so I would need a diagram..I am uncertain of "roots" and moving "up an octave" (I still think octave and pitch are the same thing!)


   
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(@jewtemplar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 186
 

OK Note...you're speaking Greek again :? ! I haven't gotten that far into theory to really understand what you just wrote...sorry I'm a visual learner so I would need a diagram..I am uncertain of "roots" and moving "up an octave" (I still think octave and pitch are the same thing!)
The root is the note the scale's named after. The root of the C major scale (or chord, for that matter) is C and likewise for all other scales. Regarding octaves, you'll note there is more than one place to find any given note in your guitar. There's an E on the open 6th string, the 4th string at the second fret, and the open first string. The difference in pitch between two adjacent copies of the same note is an octave. It also corresponds to doubling the frequency of the note, or roughly to cutting the lengbth of vibrating string in half. On a single string, one octave is twelve frets.

~Sam


   
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