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Headphone Practice

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 Jay1
(@jay1)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 47
Topic starter  

I'm a relative beginner and up until now have mostly practiced with my accoustic. I have a Vintage V99 and really want to start getting more use out of it.

I've upgraded my amp from a Fender Frontman 15R to a Vox AD30VT, which I'm not allowed to play until Christmas :( I have of course tested it though to make sure it all works ok :lol:

I've have got a serious guitar bug now and miss it when I don't have the guitar in my hands. The thing is a lot of the time when I play it will be at night or when the other half is watching the telly. Either way too much noise (which the new amp is good at) is a problem.

I have a set of cheap (£10-£15) sony headphones but the sound through them and my old amp was awful and I just didn't use them, I'd rather practice with the guitar unplugged. So I want to get some half decent headphones for when quiet playing is needed.

Has anyone got any recomendations for a decent set, that I will use almost exclusively for guitar playing. They may go in the ipod occasionaly but the guitar is by far the prority.

My budget is up to about £75.00.

Cheers guys
J


   
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(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2261
 

I have the same problem, but I can't offer advice on headphones - I just play my electric unplugged, palm-muted and very gently :)

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

I've found that inexpensive headphones work just fine. But I like the kind that actually cover your entire ear, not the lighter smaller sort.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

Avoid the Behringer line of headphones, they are very shoddily produced. I've had three and ruled bad luck out by now. Do note that the headphone-out of the Vox ain't too good, espescially with heavy rock sounds. For cleaner sounds it works fine though.


   
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(@ballybiker)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 493
 

i'd recommend the cordless type....they work great...the ones that work on fm frequency are cheap enough...somewhere around the £25-£40 mark...you will wanna make sure you get the adaptor to fit the jack in your amp though

what did the drummer get on his I.Q. test?....

Drool

http://www.myspace.com/ballybiker


   
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(@sam334)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 37
 

I bought a set of Shure E2C's and have been satisfied with them. Granted, they take a bit of getting used to, but they deliver great sound. Here's a link:

http://www.amazon.com/Shure-E2c-Sound-Isolating-Earphones/dp/B0000CE1UO


   
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(@clazon)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 502
 

Personally I'd never use earbud headphones with an amp, seeing as that can be horrific for your hearing.

I'd avoid the whole headphone thing, but I can completely understand the need for them.

I haven't been very good lately as a I've just dealt with the arguments along the way whilst playing through the amp. However anyone who it disturbs does appreciate the fact that I'm improving, so they take it with a pinch of salt.

This is by no means the answer though. :twisted:

I'd say that you should only play in clean and not beyond what the headphones can handle (so no buzzing, squeaking or rattling). This of course has its draw backs, but I imagine you want to be able to hear your lovely guitar playing in the future.

"Today is what it means to be young..."

(Radiohead, RHCP, Jimi Hendrix - the big 3)


   
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(@ak_guitar)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 48
 

I use a pair of Sony MDR-7506 that I highly recommend. Check out the whole line of Sony Pro headphones at B&H, http://www.bhphotovideo.com .

Praise the LORD with the harp; make music to him on the ten-stringed lyre. Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy. For the word of the LORD is right and true; he is faithful in all he does. Psalm 33:2-4


   
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(@timezone)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 205
 

I've never found in-ear, or even supra-aural headphones to be comfortable. Circumaural (the ones that go completely around the ear) are by far the most comfortable to me. I have a very nice set of Sennheisers - the HD 280 Pros (on my head right now actually). I keep this pair at home mostly for recording, but also for listening to music. What I like about these is that the spring is nice and tight, so they stay on your head, they're really comfortable, and they're very well insulated. I can't hear crap from what's going on around me, even though the volume through the actual phones is not that high. I used to wear these at work (I listen to music while I code), but I always missed the phone ringing (sitting right next to me). They're good for recording because if the headphones don't isolate well, then the mic will pick up your click track or whatever coming out of the headphones. Don't really have that problem with these cans. Oh, they sound good too. They're a bit pricey though at $100. I have a ~$30 pair of AKGs (don't remember which model) at work, but they're not nearly as nice as the Sennheisers. Get what you pay for I guess.

PS- the Sennheisers are more of studio monitor headphones and some people don't like them because of that. My officemate tried them once and commented that he thought there was no bass response. I tried his (also Sennheisers, but more general purpose) and thought they were terribly boomy. Depends on what you're used to / looking for I guess. I guess what I'm saying is that _I_ really like them, but _you_ may not, and it's not because they're not good headphones or anything, it's just personal preference. You might not like them is all.

TZ


   
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(@mrjonesey)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 470
 

Great cans. This is what I use and I love em!

http://www.audioreview.com/Headphones/AKG%20Acoustics/PRD_125214_2750crx.aspx

"There won't be any money. But when you die, on your death bed, you will receive total conciousness. So, I got that going for me. Which is nice." - Bill Murray, Caddyshack ~~ Michigan Music Dojo - http://michiganmusicdojo.com ~~


   
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(@sam334)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 37
 

I've never found in-ear, or even supra-aural headphones to be comfortable. Circumaural (the ones that go completely around the ear) are by far the most comfortable to me. I have a very nice set of Sennheisers - the HD 280 Pros (on my head right now actually). I keep this pair at home mostly for recording, but also for listening to music. What I like about these is that the spring is nice and tight, so they stay on your head, they're really comfortable, and they're very well insulated. I can't hear crap from what's going on around me, even though the volume through the actual phones is not that high. I used to wear these at work (I listen to music while I code), but I always missed the phone ringing (sitting right next to me). They're good for recording because if the headphones don't isolate well, then the mic will pick up your click track or whatever coming out of the headphones. Don't really have that problem with these cans. Oh, they sound good too. They're a bit pricey though at $100. I have a ~$30 pair of AKGs (don't remember which model) at work, but they're not nearly as nice as the Sennheisers. Get what you pay for I guess.

PS- the Sennheisers are more of studio monitor headphones and some people don't like them because of that. My officemate tried them once and commented that he thought there was no bass response. I tried his (also Sennheisers, but more general purpose) and thought they were terribly boomy. Depends on what you're used to / looking for I guess. I guess what I'm saying is that _I_ really like them, but _you_ may not, and it's not because they're not good headphones or anything, it's just personal preference. You might not like them is all.

TZ

I received a pair of those for Christmas last year and also really like them.


   
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 Jay1
(@jay1)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 47
Topic starter  

So you guys who are recommending headphones, like the senheisers and akgs above, do you use them plugged into your amp or is your recomendation solely based on general use.

I've heard a few people say now that headphones through a guitar amp will pretty much all sound cack if there is any sort of distortion involved. Only completely clean sounds will come out ok! How true is this?


   
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(@mrjonesey)
Honorable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 470
 

I have never attempted to play through my amp. I am only attesting to the value and quality of the AKG's.

If I need to play quiet, I use my phones along with my "Guitar Trainer." Another great buy. The guitar plays along with a CD and I can slow down the song without changing pitch. It also has a multitude of effects and sounds. Oh yeah, you can also reduce the guitar parts of the song you are playing with (only works so-so in my opinion). But overall, I love it! It's great for hotel rooms when I'm on the road.

"There won't be any money. But when you die, on your death bed, you will receive total conciousness. So, I got that going for me. Which is nice." - Bill Murray, Caddyshack ~~ Michigan Music Dojo - http://michiganmusicdojo.com ~~


   
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(@kalle_in_sweden)
Prominent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 779
 

I am using a pair of Sennheiser HD 200 Master.
They are also Circumaural and of a closed design with a good damping of "external" sounds. And not as expensive as TimeZones HD280. The nice thing with Sennheiser headphones is that you can get spareparts forever. I have even been able to buy the earbuds to my +30 year old HD414 headphones.
But I think that Arjen has a point, the headphone out from a guitar amp is not very good, and the better headphone you use, the worse sounds the amp with headphones.

Tanglewood TW28STE (Shadow P7 EQ) acoustic
Yamaha RGX 320FZ electric guitar/Egnater Tweaker 15 amp.
Yamaha RBX 270 bass/Laney DB 150 amp.
http://www.soundclick.com/kalleinsweden


   
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(@timezone)
Estimable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 205
 

The HD200 looks like a decent set of phones too. I believe those K66s are what I have in the office now. They don't attenuate outside noises nearly as much as the HD280s. (That could be a good or bad thing, depending on what you're looking for.) They're not bad headphones either, they sound just fine, I just don't like them as much as my Sennheisers. I don't find the AKGs quite as comfortable either, though that could just be my big fat head. ;) For some reason, the AKGs seem warmer (I mean temperature here) and my head starts to sweat more. A lot of this sort of thing is just going to come down to personal preference.

I mostly use my headphones for recording, or listening to music, not plugged into the headphone out on an amp. I do recall I tried it once and it was not great, it was pretty crackly, but I don't know if just the jack on my amp is screwed up or something. YMMV.

TZ


   
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