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Help switching between chords


(@caterpillar09)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 17
Topic starter  

I've found that when I release a chord to switch to another one, it mutes the sound

even though I switch to the new chord fairly quickly, having that mute sound between chords is quite jarring, especially when strumming fast.

Are there any chord-switching techniques, tips, to prevent this from happening? And get a nice clean switch?


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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5384
 

Use the open strings and slow down a bit. If you keep a steady pace you can usually just strum the open strings a bit, depending what you're doing. Espescially if you play in G, Em, C, Am F or Dm (the open chord's keys) you can often just grab some open strings.


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(@caterpillar09)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 17
Topic starter  

I only use open chords

but whatever I do, as soon as I release a chord; silence.

I can't carry the strumming sound.


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(@embrace_the_darkness)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 540
 

Well the sound of the chord will only last as long as you have the strings held down - once you release them, you lose those notes and so you lose the chord.

Practice chord changes, slowing down the transition - the goal is to be able to swap from chord to chord without removing your fingers too far from the fretboard - basically being fast enough that your fingers move from (for example) a C to a D without having a pause in between. Also, you should be moving all of your fingers into position at one time - not doing it finger-by-finger (as most newbies have to do to begin with - sorry, I dont know your playing level, but from the peoblem you are having I'm guessing you are relatively new to guitar?)

As Arjen suggested, you can also quickly strum some of the open strings during the chord change, to give a sort of "percussion" during the change.

As with everything, practice makes perfect - in time, you'll get faster with your chord changes.

Pete

ETD - Formerly "10141748 - Reincarnate"


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(@caterpillar09)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 17
Topic starter  

I suppose, though I was really hoping for some secret techniques; I'll keep at it (and yes I just began playing guitar this month)

Also, I have another guitar-related question, though I really don't want to start an entire new topic for it...

I was watching some band videos, and seeing the whole band playing different chords, at different times
I thought bands were supposed to play identical chord progressions, what exactly is everyone doing?

Is someone else in a band allowed to play a 7/5/MAJ7/6th chord at the same time as someone who is playing a plain major chord? It's just something that perplexes me when watching band videos.


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

Usually they play different voices of the chords. You listen the final result.


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(@embrace_the_darkness)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 540
 

+1 to what Nuno said

It could be that the main rythm guitarist is playing full chords mildy distorted, and the lead (or second rythmist) is playing powerchords, with more distortion ( I think this is how many modern rock bands like Greenday operate, at least as far as I can tell from watching thier live DVD's )

Rythm guitarist #1 would play and A chord like this;

0
2
2
2
0
x

which is the full, open version of A.

Whereas Rythm guitarist #2 would play an A5 powerchord (possibly a double barre using only two fingers), like this;

x
x
(6)
7
7
5

the 6 is in ( ) as it is optionally played.

Each chord is essentially an A chord, just a different 'voicing' for each one, hence the fact that they look different when played.
It's just something that perplexes me when watching band videos

The thing to remember about music videos is that they are not actually playing in the video what you are hearing - they are just "mimic" playing, with the recorded track dubbed over it in post-production, so there could be mistakes, or variations, which you wouldn't find when playing live (or creating a recording). After all, the aim of the music video is to look cool; playing techniique comes in second, I fear!

As for
I suppose, though I was really hoping for some secret techniques

the only, ONLY secret to playing guitar is...(drum roll please.........)

...
..
..
..
.
...
PRACTICE.

And thats that. No secrets, no shortcuts, no special, secret techniques.

Sorry!

Pete

ETD - Formerly "10141748 - Reincarnate"


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(@caterpillar09)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 17
Topic starter  

So an Amajor and an A5 can be played together then?

is a 5th considered just another voicing? What about 7ths/Maj7ths/6ths? Which is considered a different voicing, and which is considered a completely different chord that should not be played together?


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(@embrace_the_darkness)
Honorable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 540
 

So an Amajor and an A5 can be played together then?

They should be able to be, as the A5 is just made up of some of the notes used in the Amaj (the bass and the 5ths, hence the term 5 or 5th chord) but is not considered to be a major or minor chord.
is a 5th considered just another voicing? What about 7ths/Maj7ths/6ths?

Sorry. this is where my theory runs a bit dry!
As far as my understanding goes, a chord is only considered to be a different 'voicing' if it contains the same *core* notes which make the 'original' version, just played in different positions. The overall sound might be higher or lower, but the chord is still given the same name (but I completely unsure about this! :? )

I'm sure that someone which far more theory knowledge than me can correct / improve on what I've said.

Pete

ETD - Formerly "10141748 - Reincarnate"


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(@dagwood)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1029
 

My limited understanding to the Major vs 6th, 7th, 9th chords as different voicings question is yes and no. They're not technically voicings ( I could be wrong here) of the major chords but...yes they can be substituted.

Take a basic 1-4-5 blues progression in E

E - A- B yes?

Ok lets pretend its a blues shuffle.

E-E-E-E | E-E-E-E|A-A-A-A|E-E-E-E| etc.

Try it then with 7ths

E7-E7-E7-E7| etc.

OR mix them up.. E7 with A with B7. OR throw a Minor A7 in there and see how that sounds or feels. It all "JUST DEPENDS". Experiment with it all.

To me its like adding some spice to the mix. There's no rule that everything has to be Major chords or all minor or all 7th chords etc. It depends on the song(s) and how, where they fit.

Soon your ear will tune into the nuances of these different chords and you'll figure out more and more and more....

I promise you this, you will be confused. Hell I still am after almost 4 years but don't worry about it. Unless your a Music Major in College and you do this all day everyday (I'm not). J

ust keep at it and it will make sense later on. Ask your instructor ( You do have one right? <WINK>) and he/she should explain to you.

Sorry to ramble
D-

Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing. - Wernher Von Braun (1912-1977)


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(@causnorign)
Honorable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 559
 

Aside from using differant voicings of the chords, take a good look at the finger positions for the chords you are using. See if you can anchor one of the fingers. As an example if you are playing E,A,D songs try fingering the A with fingers 2,1,3 then slide the 1 finger over one fret to go to E or leave it anchored on the string to go to D. Hope thats clear, I sometimes have a problem expressing my thouhts in print


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