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Is my guitar worth a "Set'up"?


(@riverwolf)
Eminent Member
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

As per my other posts:
It is a 4 month old Squire Affinity HSS Strat.
I did a ton of reading on why and how it is considered a low-line entry level model.
I like it cause it plays easy, and stays in tune forever it seems. And since I now plan to keep it, I am wondering if a set-up will really do anything? Should I have it done because I plan to keep it? Even tho I have no real complaints?
Thanks again.


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 849
 

No reason not to IMHO. A setup will cost less then a new guitar, and most new guitars need one anyways. If your happy with it now, I would wait till your restringing it to do it.

Or eaven better... read up, and learn to do some of the checks, and work yourself. Eaven if you dont do all, or some of the work, knowing where you are now is helpfull

Paul B


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(@noteboat)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 4933
 

My take: if you like the guitar, it's worth more to you than its sticker price, and it's worth maintaining. And if you have an expensive guitar that you don't like, it's not worth maintaining - sell it as is and buy one you like to replace it.

I never think of my instruments as investment vehicles (even though some of my gear that I've had for 30 years has increased 20x in value). They're just tools to make music - if the tools are good, they're worth keeping up to the task, regardless of what a resale guide might say.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


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(@apparition)
Eminent Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 41
 

Read up and learn to do most the setup yourself. It's a useful skill to know and a strat is easiest to setup if you're gonna do it yourself since the bridge design allows you to adjust each string individually for hight and intonation using a long stem screwdriver and an allen wrench. You can do all this with the strings on for instant adjustment. It will not be good for your strings but if you are planning on changing your strings out, just do the bridge setup first. You can setup your pickup hight. Any time and same with your truss. Am I missing anything?


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 Crow
(@crow)
Honorable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 554
 

ANY guitar is worth a proper setup. The cheapest guitars imaginable are (often) capable of beautiful sounds if they're set up right. The exceptions are the instruments that were badly abused (warped necks) or badly designed/built (improper neck-to-body fit).

"You can't write a chord ugly enough to say what you want to say sometimes, so you have to rely on a giraffe filled with whipped cream." - Frank Zappa


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(@apparition)
Eminent Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 41
 

ANY guitar is worth a proper setup. The cheapest guitars imaginable are (often) capable of beautiful sounds if they're set up right. The exceptions are the instruments that were badly abused (warped necks) or badly designed/built (improper neck-to-body fit).

This is totally true. My first electric was a no name brand that I bought for $50 brand new. I did my own bridge setup and after a little trial and error, I could get a light gauge pick between the strings and 12th fret and it would stay in place there. There was no buzz anywhere on the fret board. I've never been able to get the action so close on another guitar again without buzzing nor have I found anyone else who could. Some times those inexpensive guitars that we are so quick to write off have something special about them.


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 849
 

ANY guitar is worth a proper setup. The cheapest guitars imaginable are (often) capable of beautiful sounds if they're set up right. The exceptions are the instruments that were badly abused (warped necks) or badly designed/built (improper neck-to-body fit).

I agree. Eaven the old broken down cheap old Parlor I got for free a month or so ago. Worth nothing. It was a cheap store brand back 40+ years ago, and had a bad neck joint. Well a few hours of work, and shes not sounding too bad. More setup to go... but every step it sounds a little better, and has a cool kinda ragged tone. OK, granted I would not have paid to have all of it done... but the point is that any guitar can be improved by a setup. No matter how cheap.

Paul B


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(@riverwolf)
Eminent Member
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 22
Topic starter  

Thanks for all the replies. It got me to thinking. I brag that I am one of the best all around Mr. Fixit guys you will ever meet. Your microwave, your computer, toaster, toilet, cabinet, whatever? So, how hard can it be? I have ALOT of tools and several nice places to work, so...
I spent a couple hours on youtube watching how to do a setup on a Strat, honestly, it looks pretty easy.
I am waiting only for one of two new (one used) guitars I ordered to show up so that I can take more time while it is disassembled.
So, when I am stuck, with pieces all over the table, I will post a pic and holler "HELP" ha-ha!


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(@s1120)
Prominent Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 849
 

I picked up this book..

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Books,_plans/Building_and_repair:_Guitar,_electric/How_To_Make_Your_Electric_Guitar_Play_Great!.html?renamed=true

a few years ago. LOTS of good info in it!! That, plus web surfing, and just diving in and doing it, has tought me alot!

Paul B


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