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Quicky Chord Q

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Danada
(@danada)
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Topic starter  

(G6/B) = what? and what are some similar chords of this type.

Off topic, I recomend learning intro/theme "My name is Jonas" real easy and real fun :wink:

Ty

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geoo
 geoo
(@geoo)
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Try THIS

Geoo

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Slydog
(@slydog)
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That's a great site, geoo! Thanks

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purple
(@purple)
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(G6/B) = what? and what are some similar chords of this type.

Off topic, I recomend learning intro/theme "My name is Jonas" real easy and real fun :wink:

Ty
Ty,
You may know everything I am about to say or maybe not so, I'll proceed just in case. It's good to know how to construct chords on your own. If you play an open C chord and strum all six strings, you are actually playing a C/E. Usually when you play a chord, the root gets the bass note. When you see, as you do here, a chord slash a note, G6/B, you are playing a G6 chord but the B gets the bass note. If you don't play the sixth string in an open G chord, the B note now becomes the bass note. The G chord is G B D, and E is the sixth note in the G scale. You can add an E note several ways as the website geo posted has pointed out. If you noticed that the G6 chord looks a lot like another chord, it is because the G6 chord has the exact same notes in it as an Em7.

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Danada
(@danada)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Topic starter  

http://jguitar.com/chord?chord=6th&root=G&bass=B

I would post the pictures here but not sure how, so i have another question about the different voicings.
I understand how you can move around the fret board to get the same notes in say a C in more than one way but how can these be the same chords illustated on the link the first row of G6/B

They are hitting the same strings except for the chords to the right of the first one just have more fingers on them.

A bit confusing i know but i hope you know what i mean. The second picture to the right of the first one has the same notes and fingering but throw in a D on the 2nd string... how does that work?

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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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To make a G6, you need G, B, D (Gmaj) and E (the 6th). All the chords shown share the 2nd fret of the A string (/B). The others are "(B), D, G, B, E", "(B), D, G, D, E", "(B), E, G, B, E", "(B), E, G, B, D". As you see they all contain the notes, required by a G6/B.

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