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(@globetro)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 75
Topic starter  

Whenever I'm playing a fast power chord progression, I wind up making these loud squealing noises as a result of my fingers sliding across the strings. What's the best technique for getting rid of this? Should I be lifting my fingers completely off the strings when I switch positions with my left hand? Or should I be employing some form of dampening on the strings? It's really making my playing sound very sloppy! Thanks for any help!


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(@alangreen)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

You have a couple of choices.

Firstly you can lift your fingers a bit more instead of sliding the mup or down the strings - this is very cheap and easy

Or you can buy a noise gate, which you can adjust to get rid of some of the noise - this costs

I don't like noise gates; I have one on a multi-fx box and it messes up the sound I'm after.

Best,

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
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(@kingpatzer)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2198
 

Noise gates are a really tricky thing to use well. Frankly, I find it next to impossible to dial one in without some "visual aide" to look at the sound signal being generated.

I can use them recording, but using them on a chain into an amp is something I've never quite been able to do.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

you merely have technique problems. that string noise diminishes has you get better at playing.
when starting out all kinds of issues seem large, too.
dont get a nosie gate. that is for bigger problems.
you could change the type of string. I used flatwounds early in my guitar learning. grew out of them.
I do like the half rounds I use.

but eventually, you wont be bothered by that noise, cause your technique will improve.
that noise was sort of my barometer to my skill level. plus, there is an acceptable amount of noise because of the nature of things.

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(@mrjonesey)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 470
 

Buy some FAST FRET. Pretty good stuff. It comes in a stick and you simply rub it up and down the length of your fretboard and then wipe it off. It really slickens your slides and such and is also good for conditioning your fretboard. It's also supposed to make your strings last longer. Oh yeah, and since there is less friction, there is less noise.

"There won't be any money. But when you die, on your death bed, you will receive total conciousness. So, I got that going for me. Which is nice." - Bill Murray, Caddyshack ~~ Michigan Music Dojo - http://michiganmusicdojo.com ~~


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(@bojack)
Eminent Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 33
 

When playing the chords, try putting your palm over the strings next to where the bridge/saddle is at (bottom of guitar). This is called "palm muting" and may help to stop unwanted noise.


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(@alangreen)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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you could change the type of string. I used flatwounds early in my guitar learning...

I always understood that the word about flatwounds was that they removed a lot of string noise at the expense of screwing up your tone

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@dogbite)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

yes they do, in a way. :(
on the bright side :)
switching to a lighter gauge often helps a player.
play nines and save the tens and elevens
for later :D

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(@mrjonesey)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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yes they do, in a way. :(
on the bright side :)
switching to a lighter gauge often helps a player.
play nines and save the tens and elevens
for later :D

That would certainly help for now, but I really prefer to just push through it and tuff it out with at least tens. Your changes will become cleaner with experience and practice and you'll really appreciate the tone from the heavier strings.

I prefer to just jump in and sink until I can swim. That should continue to work for me until it doesn't.

"There won't be any money. But when you die, on your death bed, you will receive total conciousness. So, I got that going for me. Which is nice." - Bill Murray, Caddyshack ~~ Michigan Music Dojo - http://michiganmusicdojo.com ~~


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(@teleplayer324)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1512
 

Can also try half rounds, it's a compromise between flatwound and regular and does cut down on the noise alot

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(@chris-c)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3460
 

you could change the type of string. I used flatwounds early in my guitar learning...

I always understood that the word about flatwounds was that they removed a lot of string noise at the expense of screwing up your tone

A :-)

My experience with flatwounds is that they are are certainly easier to play with less noise. Whether it 'screws' the tone or not depends on what tone you're actually after. I've got some flatties on a jazzbox style guitar and I just love the tone they give on that, but they seem less well suited to my other guitars. On the other guitars I just need to work harder on my lightness of touch to get the tone without the squeaks.

As Dogbite says, you eventually progress to being able to control how much screech you get or don't get. Flatwounds, light gauges and spray on stuff can all help, but in the end it's the 'feel' you develop from all those hours of practice that's the biggest factor. :)


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(@stormymonday)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 436
 

My experience with flatwounds is that they are are certainly easier to play with less noise. Whether it 'screws' the tone or not depends on what tone you're actually after. I've got some flatties on a jazzbox style guitar and I just love the tone they give on that, but they seem less well suited to my other guitars. On the other guitars I just need to work harder on my lightness of touch to get the tone without the squeaks.

As Dogbite says, you eventually progress to being able to control how much screech you get or don't get. Flatwounds, light gauges and spray on stuff can all help, but in the end it's the 'feel' you develop from all those hours of practice that's the biggest factor. :)

Where in the heck did you go?


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(@chris-c)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Where in the heck did you go?

Oh, I've just been...you know...decomposing... :P

Good to see you all again. :)


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(@hummerlein)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 168
 

I like to keep the string squeaky sounds. They are cool and add flavor and humanness to the playing imo.


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(@twistedlefty)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 4166
 

Where in the heck did you go?

Oh, I've just been...you know...decomposing... :P

Good to see you all again. :)

sorry for the off topic post,

Chris! good to see ya again! welcome back!

#4491....


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