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Tab/Chord Help

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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

I finally found a song I want to learn that can be played by strumming chords. The chords are: C#, G/D#, F, G# and D#. The voicings I found were:

C# G/D# F G D#
F|-----------0-----------------------------|
A|-----------2---------------3-------------|
D|----0------2--------4------3-------------|
C|----1------3--------5--------------------|
G|----1---------------------------------0--|
C|----1---------------------------------3--|

Are those right? And can full open chords be played on just 2 strings?


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

No, a full chord requires at least three different notes (different as in note names - duplicated notes don't count)

Since you're working with an altered tuning, the first step is to figure out the notes you need for each chord:

C# = C#-E#(same tone as F - they're called 'enharmonic' notes)-G#
G#/D# = G#-B# (same as C) - D#, and a D# needs to be the bass note
F=F-A-C
G# = G#-B#-D#... the only difference between this and G#/D# is that any note can be the lowest one if it's just written as a G# chord
D# - D#-Fx-A#. The 'x' means double sharp - these chords would usually be written using flats to avoid this (the chords would then be Db, Ab/Eb, F, Ab, and Eb... the sounds would be the same, but it's easier to think of a note as G instead of Fx)

So now you need to plot those out on your fingerboard:


C# G/D# F G# D#
F|----0------3--------0------3----------2--|
A|----5------3--------0------3----------1--|
D|----3------1--------3------1----------1--|
C|----1------3-------0/5-----3----------3--|
G|----1------1--------2------1----------0--|
C|----1------3--------5------3----------3--|

Finally, you figure out which voices you need to form the chords, and get rid of any duplicates that get in the way of an easy fingering - here's one possible set:


C# G/D# F G# D#
F|----0------3--------0------3----------2--|
A|----5------3--------0------3----------1--|
D|----3------1--------3------1----------1--|
C|-----------------------------------------|
G|-----------------------------------------|
C|-----------------------------------------|

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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 cnev
(@cnev)
Famed Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4459
 

Technically no, it's not a chord with less than three notes. But most of the time when you see something like that they are only playing part of the chord not the whole chord.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


   
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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

I'm sorry, I messed up writing the tab, the tuning should be for drop C.

C# G/D# F G D#
D|-----------0-----------------------------|
A|-----------2---------------3-------------|
F|----0------2--------4------3-------------|
C|----1------3--------5--------------------|
G|----1---------------------------------0--|
C|----1---------------------------------3--|

So could I just invert the fingering you have there? *is sorry once again*


   
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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

G is wrong even for a partial chord.
G is G,B,D
You are playing G# and C
Edit: those notes are correct for a partial G# chord.


   
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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Yes, just invert the first three strings.

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(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 8184
Topic starter  

Alright. Thanks for the help everyone. I might try doing it both in full chords and partial chords. Though full chords look easier, they look like upside down power chords.

I'm still trying to get the strumming pattern but I have vocals, drums and a synthesizer to hear over.


   
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