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Tip on how to get more "colorful" powerchords

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Ignar Hillström
(@ignar-hillstrom)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

You could use your index to fret the 5th fret 6th string while muting all other strings:

[5 x x x x x]

Then fret the 7th fret 5th string with your ring finger and the 6th fret 3rd string with your middle finger:

[5 7 x 6 x x]

And then just hit the strings you want to get to his:

[5 7 x 6 - -]


   
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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

This has to be one of the funniest threads ever.

Here's a chord: 1-3-5

Subtract the 3rd to get a cleaner sound for use with maximum distortion and you get:

a powerchord: 1-5

Put the 3rd back to get

"a more colorful powerchord": 1-3-5

Hmmmm.......

Its all about voiceings, man (Did I spell that right? :lol: ). It's different from a normal a chord because you are subtracting the octave, thus making it more "colorful". 8)

Just trying to help, no need to get grumpy about it. :)

Are you suggesting something like this?

D|--0--|
A|--0--|
F|--0--|
C|--12--|
G|---0--|
C|--12--|

Having the fifth an octave or so lower? Though it would only work for that chord since something like:

D|--0--|
A|--0--|
F|--0--|
C|--13--|
G|---1--|
C|--13--|

Would be hard to fret. Sorry I'm kind of lost here. Which of these suggestions are for power chords again?


   
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greybeard
(@greybeard)
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Posts: 5840
 

Its all about voiceings, man (Did I spell that right?). It's different from a normal a chord because you are subtracting the octave, thus making it more "colorful".
Just trying to help, no need to get grumpy about it.
I don't believe that helgi was getting grumpy, I think he finds the perspective somewhat unusual. :)
Most people start with normal chords and strip them down to powerchords, to fit in with distortion or a particular sound or whatever. You're coming from the opposite perspective that a powerchord is "normal" and normal chords are extra colourful.
By the way, a powerchord is not created by removing the octave from a normal triad - it's made by neutering it (you remove the 3rd, which is what determines major/minor). Many powerchord users have the octave as a "buffer" against sloppy picking - you'd normally play the root and 5th, they also finger the octave (on the next higher string), just in case the pick travels too far.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
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Ignar Hillström
(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

To add to that: when playing powerchords with the root on the 5th string some people play the fifth on the sixth string:

D5 [5 5 7 7 x x]

This creates a buffer both ways and noone will ever care if your lowest note ain't the root since the lowest note will be played by the bass player anyway. I believe this was called the 'death chord' by spinal tap, which is hereby nominated for lamest musical term ever.

OWA: Yoyo was pointing out that his major/minor voicing lacked the higher notes the 'normal' voicings have.

[5 7 x 6 x x] vs [5 7 7 6 5 5]


   
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