Skip to content
Notifications
Clear all

Tuning 101

13 Posts
5 Users
0 Likes
1,503 Views
maged farid hosny
(@maged-farid-hosny)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

can anyone tell me whats to drop tuning and stuff like that please

chuck taylor roks


   
Quote
Mike
 Mike
(@mike)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2892
 

If you want to tune to "drop D", tune it "standard" then tune your "low" E to D..........Now you are in drop D.

There is more than one "drop" tuning, give us an example and we can help you more.


   
ReplyQuote
mikey
(@mikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 329
 

I think you are asking why tune differently than the standard EADGBe.

There are numerous "alternate" tunings for your guitar. Drop D, Double Drop D, Open G, Open D, etc. (add a capo and the possibilities are almost endless)

When you play in Drop D you are moving the notes on the bottom string the E string two frets to towards the bridge. What does that mean? Your 3rd fret that used to be a G is now an F, the open E is now played at the 2nd fret, and the G now resides at the 5th fret.

So, who cares?

Well, look at your power chords in standard tuning vs. Drop D. The G power chord for instance is played like this in standard and in Drop D

Standard Tuning Drop D
e - x e - x
B - x B - x
G - x G - x
D - 5 G D - 5 G
A - 5 D A - 5 D
E - 3 G D - 5 G

Heavy metal players love this Drop D because it makes shredding easier and gives an added lower tone to the bottom end. But Neil Young also played many of his hits in Drop D. Check out David Hodge's NY lessons here at GN.

In open tuning all the open strings create a chord, unlike standard tuning where an open strum doesn't sound that exciting. Open tunings are favored by slide players, as well as others.

Why not check the Slide and Alternate tuning Forum here at GN for more info from people that know lots more than me.

Hope this helped.

Michael

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

If Drop D makes power chords easier then why use Drop C? Drop D is a lot easier to get to than Drop C from standard tuning. I'm lost......


   
ReplyQuote
mikey
(@mikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 329
 

To get to a Drop C tuning you do a Drop D tuning and then tune every string down a whole step.

That will give you a CGCFAD.

It will give you the same fingering for power chords as the Drop D, and will sound lower. Never tried it as heavy metal is not my thing. But in heavy metal it is 'how low can you go'. Not quite sure how you keep that E string from floppin all over the neck tuned down to a C though.

Michael

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

I've used it. Actually my guitar is in that tuning right now. The low E string doesn't move that much for me. Though it might explain why I've had so much trouble playing clean.


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

You probably get your fair share of buzzing?
If so it is because of the loose strings in 2 ways.
1. just because they are so loose they vibrate in a wider arc.
2. Action (string height above the frets) was probably set using standard tuning, with less tension your neck will not bow as much making your strings sit lower making it more likely to buzz.


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

I have gotten rid of most of the buzzing, just by knowing how hard to press down and where to press down. Though wouldn't I have to adjust the strings quite a bit to change the tension on the neck because the floating bridge would likely move before the neck would?


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Lowering all your strings a full step is quite a bit.
As far as the floating bridge? I really don't know much about them but I think (and I may be completely wrong) that the bridge floats up and down not in and out so tension on the neck would not be taken up by the bridge.
Like I said I really am not sure about the bridge.
Edit: you know, the more I think about it a floating bridge may well compensate for string tension with maybe occasional minor adjustments.


   
ReplyQuote
maged farid hosny
(@maged-farid-hosny)
Eminent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

how do i actually move two frets?
and how do i know that theyre in right tuning??

chuck taylor roks


   
ReplyQuote
mikey
(@mikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 329
 

how do i actually move two frets?
and how do i know that theyre in right tuning??

That depends on how you currently tune your guitar.

If you have a chromatic tuner you should have no problem. If you have a guitar tuner there might be flat adjustment button (like on the KORG GA-30 http://www.korg.com/gear/info.asp?a_prod_no=GA30&category_id=5 ) that will allow you to flatten the tuning in half step intervals. In this case you would hit the button twice, D is two half steps flat of E. When the tuner registers E you will actually have your string tuned to D.

Or you can do it the quickest way possible I know and that is this. If your guitar is currently tuned in standard then the 5th fret on the E string is an A which is also the 5th string, open A. Tune your E string down until the 7th fret on the E string is the same note as the open 5th string A.

There are other ways too, but I think the above 3 options should work for you.

Michael

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

Lowering all your strings a full step is quite a bit.
As far as the floating bridge? I really don't know much about them but I think (and I may be completely wrong) that the bridge floats up and down not in and out so tension on the neck would not be taken up by the bridge.
Like I said I really am not sure about the bridge.
Edit: you know, the more I think about it a floating bridge may well compensate for string tension with maybe occasional minor adjustments.

I figured it would. The bridge does move back and forth. It's the reason I had so much trouble getting to drop C. I had to tune it to drop C, put the locking nuts on, then start using the fine tuning pegs..........5 times.


   
ReplyQuote
Ricochet
(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Edit: you know, the more I think about it a floating bridge may well compensate for string tension with maybe occasional minor adjustments.No, that's not right. A floating bridge greatly complicates changing tuning, because it only "floats" in the right position at ONE total amount of string tension. They're a big pain. I don't want a floating bridge, or any kind of "trem" bridge. Most people who use different tunings block the trem, if their guitar has one, or put extra heavy springs on it so it's always pulled down and effectively locked in place, the whammy bar then being useful for "dive bombing" but not for raising the pitch as with a true floating bridge.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
ReplyQuote