Skip to content
Walking chords, or ...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Walking chords, or at notes played between chord changes

8 Posts
6 Users
0 Likes
5,296 Views
fishrmann
(@fishrmann)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 33
Topic starter  

Over the weekend I was taught a neat sounding little trick I'd like to explore further..... For example, I was shown to play the A string open, then A string second fret, then the D string open and then go into playing your Dmaj chord. A little scrwing around, and playing this into Dmaj, Cmaj, and into Gmaj sounded "nice".... Was this a form of a walking chord or just a little lick?

Anyone have any additional tricks like this us noobies can try out? I'm guessing there's an endless supply of little things like this to greatly enhance "chord changes" in different situations.....

PLEASE share some of your favorites here :lol:


   
Quote
mattguitar
(@mattguitar_1567859575)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 879
 

Well it depends on your take on it - you might percieve it as a little riff, some others might say its a walkdown (or up).

Suggest you do a little research on Johnny Cash. A lot of his songs use quite imaginitive little runs between the chords.

Walk the Line would be a good start.

all the best

Matt


   
ReplyQuote
Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
 

I usually call it a walking bass line. You can hear a more complicated variation of this in Stevie Ray Vaughn's Pride & Joy. This is very common in blues music so also check out some blues songs by SRV, Buddy Guy, Robert Johnson, Eric Clapton, Muddy Waters, etc. along with Johnny Cash.


   
ReplyQuote
JSnood
(@jsnood)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 84
 

This is a common technique in bluegrass as well. The April 2006 issue of Acoustic Guitar has a nice article by Scott Nygaard called, Bluegrass Bass Runs. http://www.acousticguitar.com/article/160/160,6875,THEBASICS-1.asp . You'll need the current password which can be obtained by purchasing (or perusing) the June 2006 issue.

There is no way to peace. Peace is the way. - A.J. Muste


   
ReplyQuote
jasonrunguitar
(@jasonrunguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 273
 

Here's one of my favorite basslines for you to try out. It's for going between a G and an Em.

--3---------------0-------------------
--0---------------0-------------------
--0---------------0-------------------
--0---------------2-------------------
--2---------------2-------------------
--3---3---2---0---0------------------

Walking basslines are a lot of fun and you can do them between virtually any two chords! If you know some theory, try playing hitting the notes on different scales between the two bass notes of the chords...and if not, just try some random notes inbetween and mess around until it sounds good :D

-Jason
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To those about to rock, we salute you!
http://www.soundclick.com/jasonwittenbach


   
ReplyQuote
fishrmann
(@fishrmann)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 33
Topic starter  

Cool, thanks Jason! This is EXACTLY the type of thing I was hoping for from this post! Cannot wait to give it a try after work, thanks again!


   
ReplyQuote
mattguitar
(@mattguitar_1567859575)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 879
 

there's a nice simple exercise on this here -

http://www.ezfolk.com/guitar/Tutorials/Bass_Runs/bass_runs.html

shows a few typical runs nice and clearly

hope this helps

Matt


   
ReplyQuote
clideguitar
(@clideguitar)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 375
 

Thanks Matt!

Bob Jessie


   
ReplyQuote