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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 608
Topic starter  

Hey,

i am writing a "Study for Right Hand" for the piano and i have a part where..

the note G has to be kept and held for a crotchet, and the other two fingers have to trill the notes B and C (major 3rd and perfect fourth above)

How do i write this in notation (i will be putting it into Sibelius and it will take me ages to figure out how to do it but what does it look like anyway..

I THINK its like a note held for a crotchet with a rest above the note with other notes after it, but i am really not sure..

anyone know?  :-/


   
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(@serickso)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 63
 

Is the duration of the trill also a quarter note (crotchet)?  One good way to do this is to notate the G note with the stem down and the B note with the stem up; write the trill mark over the B note (right over the stem, for the duration of the trill).  That should be pretty clear to anyone reading through it.


   
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(@alex_)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 608
Topic starter  

if you want to trill from say..

A to D..

then putting a trill mark over an A doesnt really say what note to trill, how do you mark this?

is it easier to just write the hemidemisemi-quavers?


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

A pianist wouldn't trill from A to D... a trill is always to a neighboring note.  Convention is to go to the upper neighbor, so if you write a trill on B, the pianist will use C automatically (or C#, depending on the key signature).

If you intend the trill to go to a lower note, you put a little descending 'tail' on the front of the trill symbol -- you'd use the symbol rather than "tr".

If you're looking for a rapid alteration between notes wider than a step, you've got to write it out (using 64th notes or so, depending on your tempo), or perhaps use some creative notation -- check out the bass line of Beethoven's Pathetique, where he has four half notes per measure in cut time, connected by bars in two pairs.  The performer understands that at this point he's to rapidly alternate between the two notes for a total duration of a half note.

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(@jstar)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 29
 

Alex,

I play something similar to what I think you are referring to in a lot of the blues stuff I do on piano.  I usually call it a roll, but the book I have in front of me calls it a tremelo.  It has the two notes stacked on top of each other for the desired value (in this case a half note. sorry can't remember the british system -- is a crochet a quarter note and a semi breve a half-- something like that).  Underneath the chord, the editor has placed three diagonal lines (slanting down on left and up on right) through the stem.  Under that is written tremelo, but that seems to be extra as an explanation to someone who doesn't know that the symbol of the three diagonals means tremelo.  

I would still put the stem of the note holding in the opposite direction of the two being rolled.  

Hope this helps.  

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