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Creating music for lyrics

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(@nroberts)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 305
Topic starter  

I can often times write some really good lyrics, or poems since there is no music to them. Stuff I like and would love to put music to, but I seem to be totally unable to. How do people solve this problem?

Any time I have actually written a complete song it has been creating lyrics for the music, not the other way around. The lyrics to such songs are often very forced and contrived.


   
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(@jonsi)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 128
 

Do you have any idea why you find it hard to do? Maybe the meter is the problem? My approach is to write the lyrics and the music at the same time. It works for me.


   
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(@vinmanagent11)
Active Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 6
 

Sometimes you *might* have to sacrifice some good lyrics for some good sounds, or vice-versa. However, I can think of some bands that can do this perfectly (that is, great music with wonderful lyrics). However this might be the fact that it's a cooperated effort; the lyricist talks some things out with the members of the band to change some timings and such, and the rest of the band talk some things out with the lyricist. You might think this is easier with one person, but when you have 4 or 5 people all contributing their thoughts on how a song is, it only keeps getting better, both lyrically and musically.

"War does not determine who is right; only who is left."


   
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(@sally45)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 56
 

my only idea would to be just hum a melody..any origonal melody... in your head as your writing your lyrics or poems. From there(at least for me) it sometimes escilates into an entire song. Another approach would be to read over some of your work then just start playing random chords that you think compliment the feel of the words. And, in my opinion, songs come out the worst when they are forced and do the writer no good. Writing is ment to relax you and is ment to be enjoyed..not something you feel obligated to produce...just chill out and it will come. eventually. Most inspiratrion comes when you least expect it.

I'm no Bob Dylan but I hope this helped.

Sally :D


   
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(@alangreen)
Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5342
 

My study is littered with pages full of lyrics (mostly my Sunday Songwriters Group entries) and my old pc with a load of E-jay software running under Windows 98. I've got the Sample collections too.

So, what I do is just sit around in there with all those lyrics just scattered around the floor and an accoustic guitar; and mess around with little drum loops, keyboard sounds, bass loops and so on. Eventually something clicks and the musical side to one of my songs starts there. I don't actually sit down with a song and say "Right, I'm going to write music for this one."

Best,

A :-)

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


   
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(@spadge)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 89
 

I would go with SallyJ on this one.

I usually operate the other way around, by coming up with a nice rhythm/melody on guitar, and then trying to pick out the melody in the middle of it all, that isnt yet being represented, I write to that melody so the song gets filled out.

So if you have an idea in your head of how your song sounds, sing out loud and and click your fingers, try to pick out the rhythm of the song, and the melody that isnt yet out there, but is in your head.
Find the chords that fit your voice play them once, then bring in the rhythm......

Hope this helps...

Find all you need in your mind, If you take the time


   
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