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familiarizing yourself with chords one at a time and inv.'s

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Megalomaniac
(@megalomaniac)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 48
Topic starter  

okay so,
i was looking at the newest guitarnoise lesson on the main page for peter's version of autumn leaves, and it was quite helpful with learning a couple new chords that make sense, atleast to me to be able to use and move them. but this was in particular one's that could be derived and related to original 7th bar chord shapes on the neck
which comes to my question, in hoping i can resolve it somehow or listen to opinions,
but besides these main bar chord shapes and the alterations you can put them through to give different voicings, i've been having a hard time trying to memorize inversions of some of these 7th chords and others.
i find it gets confusing when the chord itself begins on the third or fifth and works on from there. now i know how inversions work and all but i just have a hard time visualizing the potentional chords i could be playing on the guitar using more of these.

how can i try to improve my chord vocabulary by starting to learn these inversions?
any opinions or suggestions are greatly appreciated!
thanks!


   
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Kroikey
(@kroikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 232
 

I'm a complete noob, but knowing the note names on the strings will help your playing. Then since you know the name of the notes in the chord you can work out different voicings. I'm talking well beyond my ability here, but I think that would help you.


   
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Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 8184
 

take a 1st position c7 chord. you know what it looks like, the upside-down y shape.
if you play all 6 strings, you're starting on the 3rd (e)
now, think about what it looks like if you only strum the 1st 4 strings. like a dm chord shifted over. that's another c7 starting on the 3rd
now, think about what it looks like with the 1st 3 strings. now it's a c7 starting on the 7th.
you know what an e7 looks like, do the same thing.
you know what a g7 looks like, an a7, a d7, a b7. same thing.
ok, then you do the same thing with the 7th chord shapes with a barre chord. learn the note names and learn what the chords are barred all the way up the fretboard.

you're not learning new information, as much as you're looking at what you already know in a different light. it can be a chore at first to focus and memorize, but it's not impossible.


   
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