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Intimidated or Not Interested in Soloing?

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 Bish
(@bish)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3636
 

A great source of very simple solos to start with would be Creedence Clearwater Revival. John Fogerty was called "the man who never played a 16th note". John's solos are usually very simple and straightforward. He rarely plays fast either, but has a gift for playing that "perfect" note at the right time.

Get a Greatest Hits album and learn John's solos. This will get you off to a great start.

IMHO you nailed that one, Wes.

I agree whole heartedly.

Bish

"I play live as playing dead is harder than it sounds!"


   
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(@steve-0)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1162
 

Arjen makes a good point, nobody likes to practice the frustrating things but everyone likes to play the stuff they're good at. I guess my advice would be that if you want to solo, then practice soloing and deal with the frustration. However if you're content being a rhythm player but are tired with people saying "how come you never play lead?", don't worry about it.

Steve-0


   
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(@smokindog)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5345
 

Nothing wrong with just playing rhythm guitar :D I myself really suck at rhythm, and I know some really great lead players that don't play rhythm that well. Some really good rhythm players include Ian Scott, James Hatfield, Pete Townsend( I know..he plays lead guitar also) and check out some of the Jazz guitarists :D --the dog

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(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
 

Since posting this question I have been focusing on solos when I listen to songs on the radio while driving. What I have noticed thsi there are a LOT of great tunes that have absolutely no solos in them! Girls, Girls, Girls but Motley Crue is the one I heard today...unless you want to count the outro as a solo it's all rhythm work and a SMALL amount of fills...


   
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(@Anonymous)
New Member
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
 

I was fooling around with the Blues Scale in the 5th position and came up with this mess! Don't ask me what notes I was playing since I just want to get some sort of rhythm flowing. Let me know if there is anythin in here I can keep.Please don't expect much since I was just trying to see what notes make a goos sequence.

Thanks

Mike's Solo Mess


   
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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5582
 

Mike

That wasn't bad at all, so keep trying to play solos out of scales.

Lead guitar doesn't always play completely improvised solos. Many times a lead guitarist will also enforce the rhythm section.

Here is a simple solo over a 12 bar blues in the key of G. The G phrase is played with notes from the G Major scale, the C phrase over the C chord uses the C Major scale, and the phrase over the D chord uses the D Major scale.

This is a very famous riff that you have heard in many Rock and Country songs. Strum the standard 12 bar blues in G and record it. Then play this solo over it.

So sometimes lead guitar is also rhythm guitar, something you should like.


G

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g----------------------------------- Play 4 times
d--------------------------2i-------
a----------2i--2-—-5p--5-------5p---
e—-3m--3----------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

C

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g-------------------------2i-------- Play 2 times
d----------2i--2---5p--5------5p----
a—-3m--3----------------------------
e-----------------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

G

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g----------------------------------- Play 2 times
d--------------------------2i-------
a----------2i--2-—-5p--5-------5p---
e—-3m--3----------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

D

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g-------------------------4i-------- Play 1 time
d----------4i--4---7p--7------7p----
a—-5m--5----------------------------
e-----------------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

C

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g-------------------------2i-------- Play 1 time
d----------2i--2---5p--5------5p----
a—-3m--3----------------------------
e-----------------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

G

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g----------------------------------- Play 1 time
d--------------------------2i-------
a----------2i--2-—-5p--5-------5p---
e—-3m--3----------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

D

e-----------------------------------
b-----------------------------------
g-------------------------4i-------- Play 1 time
d----------4i--4---7p--7------7p----
a—-5m--5----------------------------
e-----------------------------------
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@elgalad)
Eminent Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 29
 

It's definately good to have both skills, then you can fit in with other musos in almost any situation :)

Use the Big Muff, Luke


   
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