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Piano music problem

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(@taylorr)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

Whats this thing mean?

http://www.8notes.com/school/riffs/piano/john_lennon_imagine.asp?play=on

Its got two bass clefs. Are the played at the same time (they are tied together on the left and right). If so then why are there two different staffs for the same bass clef? Is the lower one in a lower range or is it all in the same range? I was just wondering.

aka Izabella


   
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(@metaellihead)
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It's to make it less confusing...

-Metaellihead


   
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(@taylorr)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

it didnt work.

aka Izabella


   
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(@ricochet)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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It's all in the same range. The top one is for the right hand part, and the bottom is for the left hand. It's not normally done that way, but it helps one figure out how to play it.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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All the piano sheet music ive seen has been done that way.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@e-sherman)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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All it means is the Right hand is being played down further than usual. You could write it two other ways: In Treble with big ledger lines, or written up an octave with a lower octave (8va) symbol. Most likly the average guitar player wouldn't have a clue with htose versions, so they chose one that workis visually.

Hope I didn't confuse you more. I've been playing piano for almost 12 years so I might not be explaining things very well.

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(@greybeard)
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Well, I might just be going off into lala land here, but guitar music is usually written one octave higher than it really is. Middle C for guitar music is written on the C, which occupies the first space above the middle line in standard notation:

--

--
Middle C
--

--

--

In fact, middle C is on the ledger line, one below the bottom of the treble clef and one above the top line of the bass clef. So the highest note (the very first minim) on that piece of music is D above middle C - which a guitarist would play on the B string/3rd fret.

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(@taylorr)
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Topic starter  

im playing it on piano. im trying to learn some piano.

aka Izabella


   
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(@e-sherman)
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Both of the notes you mentioned, greybeard, would be a C. I think the question would be what C is considered middle C on the guitar? I have no idea, I haven't officaly found all the notes on the guitar.

The king of rock, some say lives
the lizard king, is surely dead
the king of France, lost his head
the King of Kings... bled
( email me at esherman@wideopenwest.(com). I almost never check my hotmailaccount.


   
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(@noteboat)
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The term 'middle C' refers to a specific frequency - about 261.6 cycles per second. On the guitar, that note gets written on the second space from the top of the staff, as Greybeard pointed out.

The reason is the range of instruments - on a piano, middle C is, obviously enough, in the middle - you've got about half the notes above, and half below. Piano music gets written on the 'grand staff', with a G (treble) clef for the top half, an F (bass) cleff for the bottom half, and middle C in the center of the two.

If you write guitar as actual pitch, you'd need to do one of several things:

1. Write it on the grand staff
2. Write it using two different clefs, and switch back and forth
3. Use a lot of ledger lines - low E would be 7 ledger lines below the treble clef staff.

Some composers have actually used methods 1 or 2 to write for guitar, usually as a component of an orchestral ensemble.

It's a lot easier to write an octave higher than it sounds - then you can write the whole range from low E to 1st string 12th fret E using only 3 ledger lines in either direction.

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(@taylorr)
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Topic starter  

whats a grand staff?

aka Izabella


   
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(@alex_)
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..that.


   
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(@e-sherman)
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A grand staff includes both Bass and Treble clefs.

The king of rock, some say lives
the lizard king, is surely dead
the king of France, lost his head
the King of Kings... bled
( email me at esherman@wideopenwest.(com). I almost never check my hotmailaccount.


   
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