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Strumming(up-stroke mainly) Power Chords


 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 60
Topic starter  

I seem to have a huge problem because I cannot upstroke 3 string power chords. Two string power chords are easy.
ex:
e-----------|------------------------------------------------|
B-----------|------------------------------------------------|
G--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
D--x-x-x-x--|-x-x-x-- x--x- --x--x--x--x--x--x-- -x--x---x-x-x--|
A--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7--|
D-----------|------------------------------------------------|

I bet the answer is practice!!!!! (The answer is always practice )

Any tips??

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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(@neztok)
Estimable Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 152
 

e-----------|------------------------------------------------|
B-----------|------------------------------------------------|
G--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
D--x-x-x-x--|-x-x-x-- x--x- --x--x--x--x--x--x-- -x--x---x-x-x--|
A--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7--|
D-----------|------------------------------------------------|

What do you mean?

If you're having problems hitting the low E string and can't mute it. Just play -
e-----------|------------------------------------------------|
B-----------|------------------------------------------------|
G--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
D--x-x-x-x--|-x-x-x-- x--x- --x--x--x--x--x--x-- -x--x---x-x-x--|
A--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7--|
D--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7---|

If you can't mute the D string. Play -

e-----------|------------------------------------------------|
B-----------|------------------------------------------------|
G--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
D--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
A--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7--|
D--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7---|

Otherwise practice muting strings. :D


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 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 60
Topic starter  

e-----------|------------------------------------------------|
B-----------|------------------------------------------------|
G--6-6-6-6--|-6-6-6-- 13-13- -11-11-11-11-11-11- -13-13--9-9-9--|
D--x-x-x-x--|-x-x-x-- x--x- --x--x--x--x--x--x-- -x--x---x-x-x--|
A--4-4-4-4--|-4-4-4-- 11-11- -9--9--9--9--9--9-- -11-11--7-7-7--|
D-----------|------------------------------------------------|

What do you mean?

The low E isn't the problem, the G,B and high E are. I can't avoid hitting at least 1 of them when I upstroke a power chord :(

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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(@neztok)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 152
 

I try to avoid the top strings, but when you're playing power chords on the bottom strings your left hand fingers will naturally cross the B and E strings - its a small step to use this to mute those 2 strings and let the others ring. Also the G string if needed.

Or just play full bar chords. If you're playing upstrokes bar chords probably wouldn't be a bad replacement.


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 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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Or just play full bar chords. If you're playing upstrokes bar chords probably wouldn't be a bad replacement.

Eww...bar chords. But thanks I'll try it :D

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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(@dirt325)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 1
 

hi
I really think you should avoid power chords for now. I think power chords are actually somewhat of an advanced technique requiring great rhythm and feel. You need to have full chord strumming down first (and maybe even barre chords too)

Why don't you go through at least 7-10 of david hodge's lessons here and learn the songs completely and well. His lessons involve full chord strumming and picking which you need to have down long before trying power chord strumming.

Remember also that these power chord songs are not going to help you develop the intricate guitar skills that will be useful to you in the future. Just avoid any tabs with power chords for the next few months and try David's lessons.


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 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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hi
I really think you should avoid power chords for now.

No, thanks for the advice though. I already have 2 of David's books. They are alot better than the other ones out there and have been a big help.
I try to avoid the top strings, but when you're playing power chords on the bottom strings your left hand fingers will naturally cross the B and E strings - its a small step to use this to mute those 2 strings and let the others ring. Also the G string if needed

I didn't really think of that. Kind of embarrassed now for not realizing it. Thank you for pointing it out.

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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Posts: 4478
 

What you've shown aren't really power chords they are intervals you need to use your other fingers to lay across those strings to mute them so they don't sound if you hit a string accidentally. Correction octaves.

With time you will get better and better at avoiding them.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
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In fact you are playing the same note un two different strings, each note is one octave from the other. What fingers are you using?


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 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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In fact you are playing the same note un two different strings, each note is one octave from the other. What fingers are you using?

Index and ring

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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 Nuno
(@nuno)
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Well, then try to use the middle and ring, and try to maintain the fingers perpendicular to the strings. Thus, you will keep always the index between the fingers and the nut and you can use it for muting the middle string.

Hmm, I am not sure if you understand that I mean. It is the basis for many chords such as minor 7th, 9th, 6th, and so on.

Let me see... Hope this image helps (forget the pinky):


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 cnev
(@cnev)
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I would use the index to fret the 4th fret on the A string and to mute the D and your ring finger to fret the 6th fret of the G string and mute the B and E.

You could do as Nuno suggested and by the looks the middle finger is muting the low E.

"It's all about stickin it to the man!"
It's a long way to the top if you want to rock n roll!


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 JKHC
(@jkhc)
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Hmm..this isn't really related to strumming but I kind of noticed that all Green Day songs are made of power chords. Every lead guitar part is essentially power chords with roots on the E or A strings.

Well, I guess they have to make it simple for Armstrong to sing and play lead at the same time . Perfect for beginners!

When we started the band, it was because we were waiting for a sound that never happened. We got tired of waiting, and we decided to just do it ourselves. - Mike Shinoda


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