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What does your fretboard say about you?  

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(@fluidguitar)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
14/08/2018 9:07 am  

When I see that some people only seem to play in the a- or e-minor pentatonic, just from looking at their fretboard … I realized I could spice my improvisation up too (once in a while).

What about you? and How do you do it?

currently using this improvisation app and a Juan Hernandez Profesor from 2009


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(@misterlutherman)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 24
21/08/2018 9:49 pm  

I like to play in the scale that suits my idea I'm working on at the time. I currently write a lot of stuff, and am learning Jazz soloing, so its a mixture of the aforementioned and choosing which scale will fit over a chord or series of chords. With the Jazz soloing its targeting chord tones though, so its not a scale I'm choosing per se, but basing my playing around a smaller selection of notes to fit in with the music, whilst playing around them for musical interest.

Tbh though, I've found when I create something from my head, I don't think about the scale, just the sound of the idea. However, I think that the idea I created was made possible because I know the scale well that the idea was based on, because I rarely create ideas that are not based on scales I don't already know.

Take it or leave it, the shadow is always there. Holding your hand. With a glass of ice cold lemonade in the other. Listening to reggae music. What more do you want?


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(@oldstrummer)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 46
23/08/2018 1:24 am  

A lot of study has been done on the emotional responses evoked by different scales in music. Here's one:

http://biteyourownelbow.com/keychar.htm

Sometimes, I'll try to play something specifically emotive, and turn to keys that aren't in my "normal" scales. For example, I don't usually play in the key of F#, but there's something about an F#m that I really dig. And, strictly speaking, to me an E, A, D sequence doesn't sound the same as G, C, F, even though they're the same pattern.

Duke Ellington said it best: "If it sounds good, it IS good!"


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(@misterlutherman)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 24
01/09/2018 1:25 pm  

Thats interesting. When I create songs and riffs from my head, they are in a specific key, so it makes sense that specific keys have different emotional effects, otherwise whats the point in different keys in the first place?

Do you people notice a difference in using different scales to invoke different emotions?

Take it or leave it, the shadow is always there. Holding your hand. With a glass of ice cold lemonade in the other. Listening to reggae music. What more do you want?


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