Skip to content
Disconnecting the t...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Disconnecting the tone pots

10 Posts
5 Users
0 Likes
5,604 Views
(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

Hey,
I've heard that disconnecting the tone pots on a guitar gives a slight increase in output for the pickups. To what extent is this true? I have a strat n I don't like to adjust the tone knobs - not to mention I often knock the middle one.
Would it have any other effects like on the tone? An increase in output would presumably give more hum and sustain too?

I know Malmsteen disconnects his always. So it must do something...


   
Quote
(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3221
 

I would think that, theoretically, doing this could give a slight increase in treble, but I'm not sure how there can be an increase in output. Doesn't seem likely.

My understanding is that Malmsteen bypasses the tone controls for the middle pickup only; not sure if that's correct but that's what I've read.

You could try a "no load" tone pot which essentially bypasses the tone circuit in fully open position, but still gives you full functionality when you roll it down a bit. The Fender Malmsteen Strat model uses these.

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


   
ReplyQuote
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 827
 

Hey,
I've heard that disconnecting the tone pots on a guitar gives a slight increase in output for the pickups. To what extent is this true? I have a strat n I don't like to adjust the tone knobs - not to mention I often knock the middle one.
Would it have any other effects like on the tone? An increase in output would presumably give more hum and sustain too?

I know Malmsteen disconnects his always. So it must do something...

It will basically brighten the tone. Even with the tone pot at full you will still bleed off some high frequencies to ground - you've still got an RC low pass filter in the circuit. You can get pots that switch off so that you could get the same effect and still have a tone control if you need it. This type of pot will shut off the connection to the capacitor and ground so that high frequencies won't be bled off. The Fender no-load pot does this.

Edit - beaten by Slej by only a couple of minutes. :(

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


   
ReplyQuote
(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

ok, thanks. I think I might disconnect the pot for the middle pickup. I always knock it and its somewhat darker than I was hoping so that should help that issue.
So how exactly do I do it? I don't really know much about guitar workings and repairs. Is it simply a case of unscrewing the pick guard and giving a snip the wire coming from the pot?


   
ReplyQuote
(@slejhamer)
Famed Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3221
 

Simon, I stand corrected; according to Guitar Player mag, the tone controls are completely disconnected:

GUITAR PLAYER, July 1999

[Equipment summary by Lisa Sharken.]

Yngwie Malmsteen's main guitars are heavily modified, 1968 to '72 Strats with deeply-scalloped maple fingerboards, Dunlop 6000 jumbo frets, and DiMarzio YJM pickups in the neck and bridge positions. (Like Ritchie Blackmore, Malmsteen doesn't use the middle pickup.) Additionally, the tone controls have been disconnected. His guitars are set up with high action, .008 - .048 gauge Fender Super Bullets, and tremolos armed with four or five springs and adjusted for both downward and upward movement.

His backline includes several early '70s 50-watt Marshall Mark II heads and late '60s Marshall 4x12 cabinets. Live, Malmsteen uses a CryBaby wah, a Boss chorus and flanger, and a Korg SDD-1000 stereo digital delay. He places stacks on both sides of the stage and uses the stereo delay to play counterpoint parts.

If your wiring is like the Yngwie strat ( http://www.fender.com/support/diagrams/pdf_temp1/stratocaster/0107100_02A/SD0107100_02APg2.pdf ) then you would disconnect the wires that run from the switch to the tone pots.

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


   
ReplyQuote
(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

How exactly does he make a vintage style trem float??


   
ReplyQuote
(@dick-wolkendeck)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 9
 

How exactly does he make a vintage style trem float??

Well, I think he loosens the springs on the back of the guitar bij unscrewing the two screws that hold the springs. I think, because he uses 4 or 5 springs. I do it by removing some springs altogether, I use two. The unit just comes up form the body that way so you can go up as well as down. Remember to readjust string action...

Be gentle with loosening the springs, just bit by bit: loosen a bit, retune, loosen a bit more, retune, 'till it's right.

http://www.seraphique.com

The big secret to get lots of stuff is to never get rid of anything.


   
ReplyQuote
(@simonhome-co-uk)
Prominent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 677
Topic starter  

How exactly does he make a vintage style trem float??

Well, I think he loosens the springs on the back of the guitar bij unscrewing the two screws that hold the springs. I think, because he uses 4 or 5 springs. I do it by removing some springs altogether, I use two. The unit just comes up form the body that way so you can go up as well as down. Remember to readjust string action...

Be gentle with loosening the springs, just bit by bit: loosen a bit, retune, loosen a bit more, retune, 'till it's right.

hmmm well i only hav 2 screws anyway. and iv already loosened them quite a bit in the past as the whammy action was very very stiff, and that didnt cause the bridge to float at all.


   
ReplyQuote
(@dick-wolkendeck)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 9
 

How exactly does he make a vintage style trem float??

Well, I think he loosens the springs on the back of the guitar bij unscrewing the two screws that hold the springs. I think, because he uses 4 or 5 springs. I do it by removing some springs altogether, I use two. The unit just comes up form the body that way so you can go up as well as down. Remember to readjust string action...

Be gentle with loosening the springs, just bit by bit: loosen a bit, retune, loosen a bit more, retune, 'till it's right.

hmmm well i only hav 2 screws anyway. and iv already loosened them quite a bit in the past as the whammy action was very very stiff, and that didnt cause the bridge to float at all.

Indeed. So you have to remove some springs. Use just two, the outer springs that is. You might even have to screw the screws in a bit.

http://www.seraphique.com

The big secret to get lots of stuff is to never get rid of anything.


   
ReplyQuote
 Ande
(@ande)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 652
 

My stratocopy had a "floating" vintage style trem when I bought it. I added springs to "fix" it, because it made tuning, and staying in tune, a nightmare. Doesn't look like Yngwie has that problem...

Was kind of fun, though.

Best,
Ande


   
ReplyQuote