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Guitar noise help


(@slemmens)
New Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Dear fellow guitar players,

I have a question I would like to ask, about an issue that all of us face: guitar noise.

I have a grounded Marshall Valvestate amp, a pedaltrain 2 board full of guitar effects (see below), which are powered by 2 DC Bricks.

The problem is a cyclical hiss and hum. This is very quiet when I do not switch in my combined TC Electronics MojoMojo and Dunlop MXR III distortions. It can easily be filtered out with the Decimator noicegate at the end of the train.

However, when I activate my TC Electronic polytune (first pedal in the train) so it goes into cut out mode for tuning two things happen:

1. the noise remains, meaning it is picked up in the cable chain AFTER the first tuning pedal
2. the noise intensifies somewhat

And when I activate the combined TC Electronics MojoMojo and Dunlop MXR III distortions it noise gets really loud, amplified by the distortion pedals. One distortion pedal at a time does not amplify it a lot, the two combined really does amplpify it.

I have one by one disconnected the effects and the noise stays, even with any one effect after the tuner. I then figured out that it is caused by the DC Brick power (both have the same effect), when I run the tuner on batteries but connect one more effect which is powered by the DC Brick. I also disconnected all other devices in the house, like dimmers, lamps, laptops, etc. I am pretty sure the noise is created inside the pedal train.

Furhermore, I hear a clear crackling noise when I touch the power supplies, any of the jack plugs that connect the effects, or if I twist them in their socket.

Does anyone have any idea what this might be?

I know an easy answer would be to use something other than the DC Brick, however opinions are mixed. Many people out there do not have any issues with the DC Brick.

Anyone who could give me some tips, I would be grateful!

thank you!

ps: pedals in the train (in that order) are TC Electronic polytune, TC Electronic Classic parametric sustain, Dunlop Slash Wah, looper switch to activate the combined TC Electronic MojoMojo and Dunlop MXR III distortions, Big Shot power booster, TC Electronic Hall of Fame reverb, TC Electronic Corona chorus, TC Electronic Flashback delay and ISP Decimator noise reduction. Gitaar is a quality Jackson Adrian Smith Signature San Dimas


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(@slemmens)
New Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Update: it only happens when there is a signal from the guitar (ie volume open, hit strings)


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(@derek-wilkerson)
Estimable Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 110
 

sounds like a dirty power situation and/or lower quality power supplies. you could invest in a power conditioner (which would take away a lot of the noise, so that all your pedals couldnt pick it up and amplify it in the first place).

running that many pedals in the first place is going to create a lot of noise simply because of all the circuitry running at the same time. you may also have a grounding issue with your guitar or amp. or both.

hope this gives you somewhere to start

Derek.

bassist for the crux
Randall RB-125-115 120 watt 15" eminence spk.
Randall RBA 500
2X Acoustic B115's
Peavey T-40
Indiana P-bass


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(@derek-wilkerson)
Estimable Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 110
 

I would start with the guitar and work yourself into the signal chain, you may have a resistor that went bad in one of the pedals or your power supply might not be adequate, causing a pedal to distort the signal unintentionally.

bassist for the crux
Randall RB-125-115 120 watt 15" eminence spk.
Randall RBA 500
2X Acoustic B115's
Peavey T-40
Indiana P-bass


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(@morbe)
Active Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 10
 

I would start with the guitar and work yourself into the signal chain, you may have a resistor that went bad in one of the pedals or your power supply might not be adequate, causing a pedal to distort the signal unintentionally.
+1
process of elimination is your best bet. Does your guitar have single coils Pups like a standard Strat? This tends to make it worse.
Right off the top of my head, High Gain amp + High gain Pedals = Noise make sure your using the pedals for your musical application. For instance If your running though the gain channel and using a decent amount of distortion get a booster to kick up the level during solos. Some Marshals even have a second gain channel that can be scooped to give you more punch. I wouldn't add more distortion to a high gain channel that's already distorted, it just sounds too much and generates too much noise.

Ibanez Hollowbody
1993 Fender Standard
1981 Fender Super Reverb
Fender Super Champ
Peavey Delta Blues 210

"If I live this life and can only bring happiness to one person then I've made a difference, even if that one person is me."


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