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Hard tailing a Jackson necessary

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Gdub7870
(@gdub7870)
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I'm new to guitar and have a Jackson Dinky js22. I am not going to use the whammy bar at all and I want to hard tail it, if necessary, to stay in tune as best as it can and have a warmer sound. It has a synchronized tremolo bridge. Should I hard tail it or is that bridge pretty stable. I hate having to tune before every use. Opinions?


   
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Gdub7870
(@gdub7870)
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Well?


   
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Zincberg
(@zincberg)
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Permanently hardtailing your guitar may not be the best option, however there are "permanent until you want to reverse it" options.
I use a device called a "Tremel-no".. you can find them online and they are very easy to install.

You are still going to need to tune your guitar every time you want to play though... strings stretch, not much you can do about that.


   
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Gdub7870
(@gdub7870)
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Topic starter  

Thanks man. I understand I'm going to have to tune it often but I want to make the tuning as stable as possible. Can you provide a link to the tremol-no. That is exactly what I need. Thanks :note1:


   
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Gdub7870
(@gdub7870)
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Thanks for the advice. Found an installation video of the tremel-no and they happening to be using a dinky :)


   
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bottomender
(@bottomender)
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An old school fix would be to wedge a block of wood behind the sustain block. This adds sustain while further preventing the bridge from moving when bending strings. I know this works with fender trems but having never owned a floyd equipped guitar I don't know how much room is back there. I would imagine that there is space to put one tho. assuming this works for you, when you decide to use the trem you only have to remove the block and you're back in business. Or maybe you just need to add extra springs to hold it down well enough so it won't move unless you want it to.

Blocking up a trem cavity to make it useable for a standard bridge should only be done by a pro, and it is expensive. It will also mar your guitar and is expensive to reverse. Besides, there will come a time in your playing career that you will want a guitar with a trem if only for the added fun factor. If you mod this guitar now you may end up modding it again later. If you really want a dinky with a hard tail bridge you can find them all over for the amount you would spend (or less) on this mod. Just buy one of those


   
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bottomender
(@bottomender)
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here's a link to a how to on doing the conversion...

http://www.projectguitar.com/tutorials/instrument-building/trem-to-hardtail-conversion-r42/


   
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