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how should i store my guitar?


(@six-string-suicide)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 15
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I have an electric guitar that i keep in a specific closet for it and its accessories. Its not an acoustic so i shouldn't have to worry about the woods or glue holding them together. But, should i get a humidifier anyway? or is room temperature ok? Also, what is the best way to transport the guitar? should i keep i put it in the trunk? or carry it with me? any suggestions will be welcomed

Some people don't like to stop and take a look at the big picture, i make them stop, and i make them look.


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(@notes_norton)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1497
 

I have a couple of archtops (Gibson ES-330 and Epiphone Casino) that should by all means be more "tender" than a solid body electric since they are acoustic guitars with pickups.

I hang them on the wall or on a stand. Note: I don't live with air conditioning, and I live in Florida where we have our fair share of humidity.

After at least 20 years with the Gibson, I see no problem with the guitar.

To carry it away from the home, I use an ATA approved flight case (SKB brand). I do this for my guitars, saxophones, wind synthesizers and keyboard synths. I trust nothing less. The price of a good case is minimal compared to the anguish of a broken headstock. IMHO Gig Bags are next to worthless and only a flight case will do.

I would not transport the guitar in the trunk unless I had to. It gets very hot there, and I don't want to put the guitar through extremes. However, if I thought theft was going to be a problem, I would prefer that to my guitar getting stolen.

I have a minivan, and there are two of us in my duo http://www.s-cats.com , so there is always one of us watching the van. I don't leave my equipment there in the sun, as that also heats up the gear. So I put in in the van, drive to the gig, and unpack immediately.

After getting to the gig, I leave the guitar in the case for a while, to gradually adjust to room temperature while I start setting up the PA. After I'm about half done, I open the case to let it finish adjusting. The guitar is the last thing I tune up as it reacts to temperature more than my saxophone or flute. Plus I can make minute adjustments to pitch on the sax and flute by adjusting my lip on the reed or rolling the flute a bit.

Sometimes I have to get to a gig early, because I like to setup before the guests arrive. So if there is a wait during a cocktail hour or whatever, I'll again tune the guitar and woodwinds right before I start.

This is my personal opinion (I am not a luthier or expert, and I don't play one on TV) -- I don't think the electric guitar minds changes in humidity or temperature, as long as they are gradual. I try to avoid any quick extremes and they have served me well.

Insights and incites by Notes

Bob "Notes" Norton

Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com Add-on Styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft SongSmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<


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(@dubyatf)
Trusted Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 64
 

I have an electric guitar that i keep in a specific closet for it and its accessories. Its not an acoustic so i shouldn't have to worry about the woods or glue holding them together. But, should i get a humidifier anyway? or is room temperature ok? Also, what is the best way to transport the guitar? should i keep i put it in the trunk? or carry it with me? any suggestions will be welcomed

I don't have a humidifier for my electrics - but it never really gets too dry around here. I kept a 1968 SG in its hard case under my bed for ~20 years with no-ill effects other than the foam in the case started to deteriorate and discolored a little of the neck binding. So - basically room temperature worked out fine for me.

I now store electrics there hard cases standing up in a sort of home made shelf rack so they won't fall down in my office - were I feel guilty walking by them and tend to practice more. Nitro-cellulose finishes (most Gibson electrics) are susceptible to checking (fine cracks) when exposed to abrupt temperature changes (for example a warm house to an ice-cold trunk).

Another thing about nitro finishes - many stands and wall hooks are not 'nitro safe' - and the black foam will eat through and discolor the finish. I keep a Les Paul out on a stand most of the time but drape a cloth over the black foam where it touches the finish below the headstock and at the bottom.

As for transporting in a car - I usually lay mine flat in the back of my SUV and secure with a bungee-cord. I've also laid mine flat on the rear seat and again secured it to keep it from shifting if I brake suddenly.


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(@six-string-suicide)
Active Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 15
Topic starter  

thank you for the tips guys. i forgot to mention my guitar does have a stand, which it stays in when i'm not playing it

Some people don't like to stop and take a look at the big picture, i make them stop, and i make them look.


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