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Intonation Screws- Am I screwed?

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(@piratefromhell)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

Hey, first post and stuff, but yeah.

Among my guitars I have a Shine Sil60. It's a superstrat style guitar with a floyd rose, looks a lot like a Jackson and I would say is the same kind of quality too. But I haven't been able to use it for endless days, due to intonation problems. I was checking up on the intonation, I had to loosen the screw on the bass e string as it was too high. The screw was inserted in the first hole of the bridge (you get two, the first one closer to the neck, the second to the back-end of the guitar, they only have about half an inch difference inbetween).

However, when I went to re-tighten the screw, I thought it had been stripped, as it would not tighten past a certain point. Placing the screw in another hole proved that the screw was fine, but the hole...well wasn't (hands up if this has happened to you in another context).

So my question is: Is there any way to fix this? I could try a bigger screw I suppose, but would that hold and be delicate enough to adjust intonation? Is there anything else I can do?

And if not, and I may be asking something really silly here, but could I just place the screw on the back hole instead? Is it possible to get the proper intonation like this? I AM a bit of an intonation noob really... So I don't know all there is to know about it, just minor adjustments really.

Thanks, and I salute you if you actually understand my question...because reading back on it leaves me thinking perhaps I could have explained it better. I'll post some annotated pictures of the bridge so I can explain myself clearer if no one gets this.

EDIT: Okay maybe this will clear it up a bit: The first saddle of my guitar is ussually placed on the first hole below it. This hole doesn't work anymore, the screw just turns freely inside it and doesn't tighten or catch the threads. Could I still get perfect intonation placing the saddle on the second hole? If not, is there anything I can do to fix the first hole?


   
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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

Is the screw stripped or is the threaded socket stripped? If it's the screw you could just get another one. If it's the socket that is a little more trickey. I hated my Floyd when it came to intonation and string changes. I got rid of my Ibanez Radius for that reason. Sorry I'm not more help.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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(@lunchmeat)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Is the threading dependent on the metal on the bridge, or the wood of the guitar itself?

If it's the latter, I have heard that a drop of water (or maybe two mixed with sawdust) will fill in the hole a bit, and cause the wood around it to expand ever so slightly. I don't remember for sure, though...it probably doesn't work with guitar woods, since they're generally pretty hard.

Alternately, you could just take off the bridge and fill in the hole (if the threading is dependent on the wood) with some heavy-duty wood glue, sand it a bit, and then thread it from scratch...but that might be too much work.

Really, I guess I'm trying to say that i don't know. :P

-lunchmeat


   
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(@piratefromhell)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

You know...I'm really not so sure if it is the wood the screw threads into or the actual bridge... I'll give your suggestion a try and see if it works. And yes, it is the socket that appears to be stripped. This probably happened because whoever set up the guitar at the place before I got my hands on it inserted it at an angle.

If the filling the wood thing doesn't work, I really don't want to buy a new bridge...seeing as the guitar only cost me 130 pounds... but would I have to?

I'm so glad my Dean Hardtail's a fixed bridge. It's like...the Healm's Deep of guitars, a fixed bridge.
I must also say that I have another guitar with a floyd rose and it has never had such problem.

Anyway, thanks for the replies. If anyone else can help please do..


   
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(@stengah)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 87
 

Use a tuner and check the note with the string open, then at the 12th fret, and the 12th fret harmonic. If they are all pretty much in sync with each other and the bridge piece dosen't rattle around i would just leave it alone. You could always take it back to the shop and see if they can intonate it using the other hole you were talking about, or tap the hole for a slightly bigger screw if its in the metal part of the bridge.
http://www.igdb.co.uk/pages/guitar_setup/guitar_intonation.htm halfway down on the page is a floyd showing the intonation screw. Is that the one thats stripped?


   
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(@stengah)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 87
 

Oh, I forgot to tell you in the last post, but if its the hex bolt at the front of the bridge saddle the only thing it does is help keep the bridge piece from moving too easy. The hex rods sticking out of the back of the bridge move the bridge piece foreward and back to set the intonation, the one at the front just loosens to allow the foreward or back movement of the bridge piece. If it's getting enough of a bite on the threads that it will hold the bridge piece in place, i would just leave it there. I think i got all that right, but its been a few years since i messed with a floyd-type bridge.


   
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(@piratefromhell)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

Thanks for your reply. That is indeed the one that is stripped, althouth the hole, not the screw.

But it is not tight enough to hold the saddle in place, it just moves forward putting slack on the string (the moment I tune it). I guess it was holding in place before I loosened it to adjust the intonation, but when I tightened it back the saddle just went out of place as soon as I put tension on the string. And I realised what the problem was.

I'll try tapping it with a slightly bigger screw (which might take a while...screw hunting -.-) and I'll also just try filling the wood with something. But does anyone else have other ideas of what I could do?

I can't really take it back to the guitar shop as I ordered it online. And my local guitar shop isn't exactly...local...at least 5 hours away on tube or something.

Thanks for the help I'm getting.


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

For something that doesn't get screwed in and out a lot, I have successfully replaced threads in a stripped out hole this way: Coat the screw threads with some sort of release agent that will prevent glue from sticking to it. (I have used Rain-X, Johnson's Paste Wax, and oil. Wipe it off so it's just a thin, slick coating.) Leave the hole clean and dry. Apply well mixed epoxy cement to the threads of the screw, and screw it in place. Let it harden overnight. Screw the screw back out. The epoxy stays lining the hole, with new threads molded in from the screw.

It's not heavy duty, and the epoxy will break down with a lot of screwing. But if it's something you'll rarely screw and unscrew, it can work.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@lunchmeat)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 153
 

Hey...that's genius, Rico. Have you ever tried it with heavy-duty wood glue? I've heard that there is wood glue that is almost a subsitute for the wood itself - it is very strong stuff. I'll have to look up that information. It would seem as though your solution, combined and a very well-setting glue, would solve the problem almost permanently.

-lunchmeat


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Yes, where the hole is stripped out in wood I've done it with wood glue. I've used the epoxy where threads were stripped in metal.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@piratefromhell)
Active Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

Wow, thanks for the replies guys.

I checked and the screw does thread into the bridge, not the wood. So I guess I'll just try retapping it? I'll see if I can try all the other suggestions too.

Thanks, I'll let you know how it turns out. And if anyone's got any other suggestions them keep 'em coming :lol:


   
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(@racetruck1)
Honorable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 518
 

Loc-tite makes a thread restorer kit that works just like what Ricochet describes, and its a lot tougher than epoxy, you can find it in auto parts stores. It includes the glue, and a release agent for the screws.

The problem with tapping a larger hole is finding a tap and also finding a larger screw.

You could also see if there's a web site from the manufacturer of your guitar and see about the availability of replacement parts, or check out Stewart MacDonald for parts.

When I die, I want to go peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming......
like the passengers in his car.


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

Loc-tite makes a thread restorer kit that works just like what Ricochet describes, and its a lot tougher than epoxy, you can find it in auto parts stores. It includes the glue, and a release agent for the screws.
That's great!

I was inventing out of necessity when I first did that years ago.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@stengah)
Trusted Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 87
 

Yea, if you're not taking it to a shop to get it repaired, you might mess it up trying to tap for a new screw yourself. You would have to have the exact right tools,and screw for that to work. Plus experience dosen't hurt. If you're gonna try to fix it alone, I would try one of the other suggestions. It might be a lot eaiser, and you don't have to bore a hole into your bridge.


   
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(@trguitar)
Famed Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

I always knew you were an innovator Ric!

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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