Skip to content
Oscillation issues ...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Oscillation issues with drop d

8 Posts
3 Users
0 Reactions
305 Views
 Lore
(@lore)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

My e string rings true and imperfect tomb with the tuner. When I drop 2D there is oscillation and you can see the tuner needle moving up and then back down. And you can hear this oscillation with or without amp. I've tried to lower all the pickups all the way down no difference. I've raised the saddle in case it was lightly touching any frets with no difference. I've also tried larger gauge strings thinking it's a tension issue and no difference. I cannot figure this out. ?? Does anyone have any ideas? I'm about ready to buy a new guitar.


   
Quote
(@paulhackett)
Prominent Member Admin
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 794
 

Hi and welcome to the forums,

Maybe we can help you troubleshoot this. First, you didn't say what kind of guitar you're having this issue with. I'm guessing electric but what make of guitar is it? Next, which e string is giving you the issue - low e or high e?

Also, what kind of tuner are you using?

One thing I always do when I encounter this is mute all the other strings. Lightly touch all the other strings with the palm or fingers until only the string you want is ringing out. This helps the tuner get a clearer reading of what's going on. Why don't you try that and let me know how it goes?

Guitar Noises Newsletter


   
ReplyQuote
 Lore
(@lore)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

@paulhackett thanks for your reply! It is the low e that I'm detuning to a d. For drop d tuning. It's not the tuner I've tried different tuners, besides all the other strings don't have this issue. And it only happens to the low e when I detune it otherwise it's perfect


   
ReplyQuote
(@paulhackett)
Prominent Member Admin
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 794
 

Does it sound in tune to you? If it's not the tuner or feedback from another string might be worth taking to a shop that does setups and repairs. Take a really close look at the frets. What kind of guitar is it?

Guitar Noises Newsletter


   
ReplyQuote
 Lore
(@lore)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

@paulhackett , hey Paul, it's an epiphone strat .  I made a slight decrease in neck relief, then the intonation had to be adjusted again. And on top of that, I tuned the guitar to itself through harmonics instead of tuning to each individual string through tuner. Anyway,  not really sure which thing I did made it better. I appreciate you thx


   
ReplyQuote
(@paulhackett)
Prominent Member Admin
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 794
 

Great. So glad you got it worked out.

Guitars are like cars sometimes. When things keep going wrong you start to ask why don't I just get a new one? It's frustrating.

Guitar Noises Newsletter


   
ReplyQuote
(@nethanpaul)
Trusted Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 46
 

If you're frustrated with the wobbly E string on your guitar, don't give up just yet! Here are a few things to check. First, make sure the E string's intonation is right at the 2nd fret by adjusting the saddle screw. Check if the bridge is secure and not wobbly, and inspect the nut slot for smoothness. Also, look out for any grounding issues or loose wires in the electronics. If the problem persists, mute other strings to isolate the sound, try using an electronic tuner for accuracy, and if needed, seek help from a professional guitar technician for a thorough check and fix. Small tweaks can make a big difference in getting your E string to sound stable and in tune!


   
ReplyQuote
(@nethanpaul)
Trusted Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 46
 

I understand your frustration with the oscillating E string. Before throwing in the towel on your guitar, let's explore some potential culprits besides just Guitar Parts. Here are some things to consider:

String Damping:

  • Mute: Double-check that the bridge mute (if present) is fully deactivated or removed.
  • Palm Muting: Ensure you're not accidentally palm muting the string while playing.
  • Fret buzz: Inspect the E string for any buzz against the frets, especially around the 12th fret. Adjust the truss rod slightly if necessary (consult a professional if unsure).

Other Hardware:

  • Tuning machine: The E string tuning machine itself could be faulty, causing instability. Try replacing it with a new one.
  • Bridge: Check for any loose components in the bridge, especially around the E string saddle. Tighten any loose screws or consult a technician if needed.
  • Nut: Inspect the nut slot for the E string. If it's too wide or worn, it can cause oscillation. Consider having a professional luthier cut a new, properly sized slot.

Intonation and Pickup Interference:

  • Intonation: Double-check the intonation, especially for the E string. Slight misalignment can create tuning inconsistencies.
  • Pickup height: While you lowered the pickups, try raising them slightly (especially the neck and middle pickups) to see if it reduces magnetic pull and oscillation.
  • Pickup phasing: If your guitar has multiple pickups, try adjusting their phasing (if possible) to see if it eliminates unwanted interference.

Additional Tips:

  • Experiment with string brands and gauges: Different string materials and gauges can have subtle effects on resonance and damping.
  • Seek professional help: If you've tried all these suggestions and the problem persists, consult a qualified guitar luthier or technician. They can diagnose the issue more precisely and recommend specific Guitar Parts replacements or adjustments if needed.

Remember, throwing away a guitar should be a last resort. By systematically addressing potential causes and seeking professional help if needed, you can likely get your E string singing true and clear again!


   
ReplyQuote