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Mains + Monitor question

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(@fprod)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

I have an EP2500 running 2 Peavey SP5 (800w 8ohm) 1 per channel.
I also have an EP1500 running 4 Peavey TLS 12" monitor (500w 8ohm) 2 per channel.

In a mid size room (150 - 200 people) this setup has been ideal, the mains are smoking, but the monitor are a bit lacking, hard to get the volume up without peaking the amp. I am now about to start running sound in a pretty large size room 500 - 700 people. I am planning on mic'ing all the instruments to put them in the mix how I want them, as well as put them in the monitors, but my current monitor setup just won't handle it. I was thinking about using the EP1500 for the mains and bridging them to get 700w per speaker on the mains. And then use the EP2500 for the monitors (left and right channels). I've heard that bridging mains isn't always the best idea, but I have never tried it. Any suggestion? Or do I just not have enough power?

Oh and the genre of music will be hard rock/metal.

I also have an EP2500 running bridged to 2 Peavey SP1 1200w subs and another EP1500 running bridged to 2 CGM 800w Subs.

Thanks
Ryan


   
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(@danlasley)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2118
 

Yes, your new arrangement should work better than what you have now. Whether it will be sufficient remains to be seen/heard.

Also, remember to reduce the low frequencies (say under 100Hz) to the monitors. I assume that you've got a crossover for the subs that will do the same for the mains.


   
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(@kent_eh)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Unless there is a compelling reason, don't try to put absolutely everything into the monitors.
The more you add in there, the more cluttered it gets, and the harder it is for the singers to hear themselves, which is really the point of having monitors in the first place.

Try to keep vocals and un-amplified instruments (acoustic guitar) in the mons and pull the restr out.
Drums and guitar amps are usually easy enough to hear onstage without help from the monitors.

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


   
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(@fprod)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Topic starter  

Thanks for the input!

The only reason I want to put everything through the monitors is so I can get the guitar players to turn down their friggen amps. The stage is fairly large and even with the amps cranked, one side of the stage will always complain about not hearing the other side, and the drummer usually says he can't hear anything except for the vocals. My plan was to mic everything, turn down the guitar amps, and then pump what is needed through the monitors. I figured that if the backline isn't as loud, then the vocals should cut through alot more, and this just may be me, but guitars don't really take up alot of amp power when mic'ing them. I turn them up just enough to put them in the mix a little better.


   
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(@danlasley)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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Thanks for the input!

The only reason I want to put everything through the monitors is so I can get the guitar players to turn down their friggen amps. The stage is fairly large and even with the amps cranked, one side of the stage will always complain about not hearing the other side, and the drummer usually says he can't hear anything except for the vocals. My plan was to mic everything, turn down the guitar amps, and then pump what is needed through the monitors. I figured that if the backline isn't as loud, then the vocals should cut through alot more, and this just may be me, but guitars don't really take up alot of amp power when mic'ing them. I turn them up just enough to put them in the mix a little better.

As noted elsewhere, put the guitar amps on chairs, and point them across the stage toward each other (and the drummer), then mic them for the mains and you're done. Er, mostly.


   
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(@trguitar)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Unless there is a compelling reason, don't try to put absolutely everything into the monitors.
The more you add in there, the more cluttered it gets, and the harder it is for the singers to hear themselves, which is really the point of having monitors in the first place.

Try to keep vocals and un-amplified instruments (acoustic guitar) in the mons and pull the restr out.
Drums and guitar amps are usually easy enough to hear onstage without help from the monitors.

My thoughts exactly. And as mentioned above, the amps off to the side facing the performers. I'm far from an expert on this as I only have a modest system, but this makes it more crucial that I only have the vocals in the monitors. My monitors are small speakers, great for voice but you can't cram too much into them or they go to mush.

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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(@corbind)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1735
 

Dan, that's what I've done at the last few gigs this summer but only pointed my amp 45 degrees instead of 90 toward the drummer. One other guitar player put his 90 degrees toward himself and the rest of the band shot straight out. We're all mic'ed and in the monitors. Maybe not so good, but I'm not runnin' the show.

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


   
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