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Mic-ing an acoutic

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(@blutic1)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

I have a 1500 watt PA system with huge speakes. However, I cannot get my acoustic to come loud enough to compete with the rest of the band when I mic it with my Shure Sm-57. It's definitely loud enough for a singer. Is there something that I'm missing?


   
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(@forrok_star)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2337
 

Have you tried using a pre-amp or eq?

mic-> pre-amp-> eq-> mixer

Example Pre-amps

Joe


   
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(@blutic1)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

No, I have never used one.


   
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(@mattypretends116)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 530
 

pre amps help, even with a dynamic mic like 57. give it a shot

"Contrary to popular belief, Clapton is NOT God. The prospect that he is God probably had a large hand in driving him to drugs and booze. Thanks everyone."

-Guitar World :lol:


   
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(@cmaracz)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 155
 

Hey, sorry to add my own off-topic question, but what's the difference between a pre-amp and an EQ. I thought the two weere the same thing, choosing which signals to boost and which to reduce before that sound gets amplified.


   
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(@diceman)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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I believe the problem lies in the type of microphone you are using . Dynamic microphones ( SM-57 ) are great for mic'ing snare drums , guitar amps and even vocals but you need to be real close to the sound source . The sound quality drops off the farther away you get from the microphone . Condenser mic's are much better at picking up sound from a distance , which is why they are often used to record or pick up cymbals from overhead . Of course , they would also have the capability of picking up other sounds that you might not want , but I believe with proper placement you could eliminate much of that as well . With the SM-57 you need to be not more than 3-6 inches away and hold very still . The most popular method for onstage sound is to mount a pick-up inside the guitar itself or in the soundhole and then use a guitar pre-amp . Fishman makes a very good one that has a 4-band EQ along with volume , compressor , and XLR connector . It also is a DI box . I know that it means having to buy more equipment , but the end result is the freedom to move around on stage .

If I claim to be a wise man , it surely means that I don't know .


   
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(@greybeard)
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The negative of a condenser mic is that it requires phantom power (usually 48V), which means a power source, either a mixer with inbuilt phantom power or a condenser mic pre-amp.

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(@wishus)
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A 57 is not a good mic for live acoustic guitar. You can not get it close enough to sound good without it getting in your way. You need a pickup or a condender mic; each has pros and cons, as others have mentioned. Personally, I would go for a nice pickup like the Fishman Rare Earth. If you really want to use a mic, look into small diaphragm condensers. AT 4041, AKG 391, AKG 451, or even Shure SM81 would be good candidates. All of these require phantom power, as greybeard noted.

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(@diceman)
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Another option is the electret-condenser microphone which has a battery of its own .

If I claim to be a wise man , it surely means that I don't know .


   
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