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About Chord creation and Scales

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(@joehempel)
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I'm trying to figure this out, and I think I have some sort of idea, but want some clarification if anyone can help.

In the creation of the chord, the chord name is based of the root of the chord correct? Then what makes the chord the chord, is it using a circle of fifths rule, or thirds, or something like that?

On scales, when starting a scale, you just go from one step to the next like a G scale would be (G=E-3rd fret, A-open, B=A 2nd Fret, C=A rd fret, D-open)) etc. Or am I just completley wrong on this.

Thanks, just trying to get some theory in my head little by little.

In Space, no one can hear me sing!


   
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(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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This might help get you started. Then go to "The Power of Three" for the beginning steps of chord creation and "Building Additions" to get the trickier stuff.

https://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/the-musical-genome-project/

Hope this helps.

Peace


   
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(@fretsource)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 973
 

In the creation of the chord, the chord name is based of the root of the chord correct? Then what makes the chord the chord, is it using a circle of fifths rule, or thirds, or something like that?

On scales, when starting a scale, you just go from one step to the next like a G scale would be (G=E-3rd fret, A-open, B=A 2nd Fret, C=A rd fret, D-open)) etc. Or am I just completley wrong on this.

Yes, most chords are built from thirds, e.g.,The chord A minor contains notes: A C & E. A to C is a third: A-(B)- C and C to E is a third: C (D) E).
Those two thirds aren't the same size, though. The first one is a little smaller than the second third so it's called a minor third, and that's why the chord is called minor too. The bigger third is called a major third
Minor 3rd + major 3rd = minor chord
major 3rd + minor 3rd = major chord
minor 3rd + minor 3rd= diminished chord
major 3rd + major 3rd = augmented chord

If you add more notes separated by 3rds, you get 7th chords, 9th chords etc.

As for the scale, yes, you play the G major scale using the notes you said. But you don't have to play them at those places on the guitar. For example, the second note you mentioned "A" could be played on the 5th string open, as you said, OR it could be played on string 6 fret 5. You could even start on the open G string and play the whole scale on the same string. As long as you play the correct notes names in order, you're playing the scale.


   
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(@joehempel)
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Okay, thanks Dave and Fret, I actually looked at another lesson about this in the lessons section, but the one that you linked to was helpful as well Dave.

Fret, thanks for the help in explaining some of this, I understand it a bit better now. I do understand that playing the scale could be done anywhere on the guitar, but wasn't sure if it was just playing whole steps or playing half steps as well (like you said it takes longer to get to some notes than others, eg. B-C or C-C#-D)

thanks to both of you.

I guess my next question is, on playing these chords, do the open strings count in the creation of the chord itself, for example the E Chord (6-open, 5-B, 4-C, 3-G#, 2-B, 1-E), and when would you not play all the strings (high strings) when playing a chord.

sorry if this seems like a lot to ask, but I seem to understand things a bit better with different people chiming in and saying something.

In Space, no one can hear me sing!


   
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(@fretsource)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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Glad to help Joe.
As for the scale steps, just keep in mind that the notes of the major scale are found by following a strict order of whole steps and half steps: W W H W W W H, and that every letter name is used once only (apart from the end letter, which is the same as the first)
So you can never have, for example, C and C# in the same major scale. That C# would have to be called Db as in the Ab major scale:
Ab (W) Bb (W) C (H) Db (W) Eb (W) F (W) G (H) Ab

Edit: I just saw your next question. You must have added it while I was typing :D

The E chord contains notes E G# and B (There's no C in it )
You can play any of those notes anywhere you find them and open string notes are just as valid as fretted notes. It's up to you where you choose to play them and also which ones you want to double (The chord has 3 notes but you have six strings, so doubling any or all of those notes is normal practice). Just as long as you're playing nothing but the notes E G# and B, you're playing an E major chord.


   
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(@joehempel)
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So basically a scale done in say C#, is exactly the same as Db is what you are saying.

And a sharp/flat scale just starts with a sharp or flat, and then follows the same pattern as a major scale.

In Space, no one can hear me sing!


   
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(@fretsource)
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So basically a scale done in say C#, is exactly the same as Db is what you are saying.

And a sharp/flat scale just starts with a sharp or flat, and then follows the same pattern as a major scale.

It sounds exactly the same but the notes are named differently in order to conform with the scale note naming system that we use.
C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#
Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db


   
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(@joehempel)
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Got it, thanks a bunch!

Whoops, saw my error in the construction of the E Chords, thanks for pointing that out

In Space, no one can hear me sing!


   
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